Monthly Archives: February 2013

Cowboy Church, Hey There Pilgrim, Grab Your Bible.

There is a new church in town. It’s a bit different than your grandmaw’s. It’s a Cowboy Church! Instead of suits, ties and winged-tipped shoes, you are likely to see buckles, boots, hats, and jeans. Our method is certainly different but our message is the same ol’ story of Jesus and His love!

The first time I went west, I ended up in Texas, when I got there, I felt I wasn’t going anywhere, and I felt I had nothing left in me.  I found myself in a little church, prayin, and askin for the man upstairs to guide me. I knew I was half good, but am I? Or am I mostly bad? Still struggling with the PTSD, I face everyday, I bring myself to my toughest of times, knowing that things are not ever really bad.
The first I ever heard this song was in that lil cowboy church in Texas, it made me feel like I was home, and finally right where I needed to be. I miss that church, and I miss the west. Only wish I’d had made it to Cheyenne.Maybe the good Lord willin, I will make it there someday, but in the meantime, I will continue living somewhere between Jesus,and John Wayne.

The Purpose of a Cowboy Church is to Impact the Cowboy Culture With the Gospel of Jesus, in hopes to keep the cowboy and cowgirl an honest fella. We continue to prey that we are “Somewhere between a cowboy and a saint, while crossing the open range, and always be somewhere between Jesus, and John Wayne.”
The Cowboy’s Ten Commandments are below, and if ya need a better way of livin’ well pick up yer bible, and head to the Cowboy Church. Live by these simple rules, and trust me, you will remember the experience forever.
Cowboy’s Ten Commandments
 
  1.   Just One God
  2.   Honor yer Ma & Pa
  3.   No Tellin Tales or Gossipin
  4.   Git Yerself to Sunday Meetin
  5.   Put Nothin Before God
  6.   No Foolin Around With Another Fellow’s Gal
  7.   No Killin
  8.   Watch Yer Mouth
  9.   Don’t Take What Ain’t Yers
  10. Don’t Be Hankerin For Yer Buddy’s Stuff

History of Cowboy Church, across America:

Local Christian churches within the cowboy culture  are distinctively Western heritage in character. A typical cowboy church might be in a barn, metal building, arena, sale barn, or old western building, have its own rodeo arena, and a country gospel band. Baptisms are generally done in a stock tank, or waterin troth. The sermons are usually short and simple. Some cowboy churches have covered arenas where rodeo events such as bull riding, team roping, ranch sorting, team penning and equestrian events are held on weeknights. Many cowboy churches have existed throughout the western states for the past forty or fifty years, however just in the past fifteen or so years has there been an explosion of growth within the “movement”. Prior to 1980 there were no less than 5 cowboy churches in Texas, now the number exceeds 200, and there are an estimated 750 nationwide. There has been no definitive group that established the movement; rather it seems to have had a spontaneous beginning in diverse areas of the country at nearly the same time. Some of these cowboy churches are an outgrowth of ministries to professional rodeo or team roping events, while the roots of many can be traced back to ministry events associated with ranch rodeos, ranch horse competitions, chuck wagon cooking competitions, cowboy poetry gatherings and other “cowboy culture” events.

So we hope to see ya, here or there, maybe in church, or on the range. No matter where it is, love thy brother, and treat each and everyone with respect. have pride in yourself, and never give up. God Bless Ya, all. Come on back if yer passin through Amen!

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Categories: Cowboy Code, Western | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Sunday Matinee~The Old Chisolm Trail~The Ballad of America

http://borivers.webs.com/The%20Old%20Chisholm%20Trail%20-%20Michael%20Martin%20Murphey.mp3″

The Old Chisolm Trail

Oh come along, boys, and listen to my tale,

I’ll tell you all my troubles on the ol’ Chisholm trail.

(chorus)

Come a-ti yi youpy youpy yea youpy yea

Come a-ti yi youpy youpy yea

I foot in the stirrup  an’ I hand on a- horn,

I’m the  best damned cowboy ever was born.

On a ten dollar horse and a forty dollar saddle,

I goin inta punchin’ Them long horn cattle.

Started up the trail October twenty-third

Started up the trail with the 2-U herd.

Woke up one morning on the Chisholm trail,

With a rope in my hand and a cow by the tail,

I’m up in the morning before daylight,

And before I sleep the moon shine bright.

Oh, it’s cloudy in the west, and a lookin’ like rain,

And my darned old slicker’s in the wagon again.

No chaps, no slicker, and it’s pouring down rain,

And I swear, by God, I’ll never night herd again.

Last night on guard, and the leader broke the ranks,

I hit my horse down the shoulders and spurred him in the flanks.

The  wind began to blow and the rain began to fall,

And it looked by god we was gonna lose ’em all.

Crippled my Horse, an don’t know how

Ropin at the horns of a 2-U cow.

With lighnin in his eye, and thunder in his heal.

He went spinnin round like a houp on a wheel

My hoss throwed me off at the creek called Mud

My hoss throwed me off and I landed with a thud

Last time I saw him he was runnin cross the level,

Kickin up his heals, and runnin like the devil.

We rounded ’em up and put ’em in the cars

And that was the last of the old Two-U Bars.

I went to the boss to get my roll,

Boss had me figured for nine dollars in the hole.

Well me an the boss had a lil spat,

So I hit him in the face with my ten gallon hat.

Well my boss man said, “Well I’ll fire you,

Not only you, but the whole damn crew.

So I sold my horse, and I sold my Saddle,

An’ you can go to hell with your long horn cattle

And I hadn’t been home two days or three,

I put off my gal for to see.

Tammy said “you better quit that cowboy life,

If you ever want to have a pretty little wife.

I’ll sell my saddle, and buy me plow

Swear by god, I’ll never rope another cow.

Texas Confederate soldiers returning home from the Civil War found that in their absence the herds of longhorn cattle they were raising before the war had doubled in size and were now roaming the southern tip of the state unbranded. They were so plentiful that they had little value in Texas, but the industrial cities of the North were booming with immigrant labor and hungry mouths to feed. So began the era of the American cowboy and the great cattle drives, in which cattle were rounded up and herded north into Kansas, Missouri, and Wyoming. There they met the new railroad lines that could carry the meat to the East Coast.

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The first trail that was widely used for these long drives was called the Chisholm Trail. By the time the trail fell into disuse in 1882, hundreds of cowboys had driven tens of thousands of cattle up the trail, inventing and singing countless verses to Old Chisholm Trail.

 

See Ya’ll here in the morning, with a little Cowboy Culture.

Categories: Civil War, Cowboy Code, Western | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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