Dear Jesse James, it’s Me Bob Ford (A letter from the grave)

“With only a generalized wish for revenge on Bob Ford, Edward O’Kelly, walked into the tent saloon and blasted Bob Ford with a shotgun. There would be no eulogies for Bob, no photographs of his body would be sold in sundries stores, no people would crowd the streets in the rain to see his funeral cortege, no biographies would be written about him, no children named after him, no one would ever pay twenty-five cents to stand in the rooms he grew up in. The shotgun would ignite, and Ella Mae would scream, but Robert Ford would only lay on the floor and look at the ceiling, the light going out of his eyes before he could find the right words.” ~The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford

Robert Newton Ford Said to be holding the gun that killed Jesse James

Here are the right words from beyond the grave of Robert Newton Ford, a distant relative on my Mother’s side. I have written the letter Bob Ford always wanted to write.

Dear Jesse,

Looking back at killing you, I now know of how cowardice it truly was. Only in my own murder will I truly know how cowardice I was. While I lie here taking my last dying breath, and the cold running through my body and the light disappearing from my eyes, I want you to know, that I was always ashamed, and regretted killing you. Even when at times I felt proud, truthfully, I was as ruthless as I could be. Thinking back on it, I always knew you saw my reflection in the glass of that picture frame, when I raised my pistol, and I have always known you saw the fear in my eyes. I fear that no one will ever know of my reflection that of which you could see. I have always wondered why you did not move, or dive off the chair as you heard the clicking from the pistol chamber, and afraid, you may have killed me if you had. I have found that life has been nothing more than distasteful, and unbearable, and at times wish that I had the courage my brother Charles did and kill myself. I cannot help but wonder how Ed will feel years from now, if he will regret shooting me with that sawed-off-shotgun, or if he will be able to hold his composer as I did for murdering you. If I could only explain to you why I had to kill you, I would find no answer, nor offer an explanation either, what I did was more than betrayal, and will always be a cold-blooded coward’s unpleasant act of murder and nothing else.

I guess I am that dirty little coward that shot Mr. Howard, and lay Jesse in his grave.  I thought at the age of 20, that I was brave, but now at the age of 30 what I had done was no more than dirty.

These being my final thoughts, while lying in  my own blood, if it offers anything more to what I have done, I would like to apologize for killing you Jesse, and hope that you will forgive me.

Yours Truly
Robert Newton Ford

Readers Interaction::
Do you think that if Robert Ford had a few moments left of his life that, he may have said these words? Or would he have been too proud of his accomplishment to utter anything at all?

Categories: History, Letters from the grave, Western | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Legend Series Captain Sam Sixkiller Indian Territory

The History of Sam Sixkiller an outstanding lawmen of the Indian Territory.

Researched By Shotgun Bo Rivers @shotgunborivers

I read in a recent comment somewhere, some questions raising about who Sam Sixkiller was, and decided since I am also Native American that I would do some searching online about the man. I thought what a name to use as a character in a story Sam Sixkiller, however it would be hard to use a true outstanding lawman in a story, if I knew nothing about him. So far this is what I have found, some of which I have quoted, so not to mislead the story of such a wonderful icon of the wild west, and of the Indian Territory.

The story of the frontier Indian police in the history of Oklahoma is very important. It is one of the unsung stories in the annuals of law enforcement in the Wild West. Oklahoma, prior to statehood, was known as Indian Territory, and after 1889, Oklahoma Territory was added. Today, the most commonly thought of lawmen who worked the territories were deputy U.S. marshals. However, the Indian police were there and were probably as important if not more so.

Longhorse Police Captain Sam Sixkiller

As early as 1808, the Cherokee Nation passed an act appointing “regulators” to suppress horse stealing and robbery, to protect widows and orphans, and to kill any accused person resisting their authority. This action was taken when the Cherokees were located in the South U.S., before the “Trail of Tears.” Indian Territory, later Oklahoma, initially was made up of the Five Civilized Tribes: the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole. After the move to the west, during the 1830’s and 1840’s, the Indian nations set up their law enforcement system and judicial courts similar to what they had in the East. The Indians were called the Five Civilized Tribes because they had adopted many of the customs and traditions of the Europeans, including African chattel slavery for agricultural development. The only nation that had a different scenario initially was the Seminole Nation which had embraced African fugitives slaves as their allies against the U.S. government.

One of the first outstanding Indian police officers was the legendary Cherokee, Sam Sixkiller. Sixkiller at the age of nineteen joined a Union Indian artillery company under the command of his father, 1st Lt. Redbird Sixkiller, during the Civil War. In 1875, Sixkiller was appointed high sheriff of the Cherokee Nation and warden of the National Penitentiary. On February 12, 1880 Sixkiller became the first captain of the United States Indian Police headquartered at Muskogee, Indian Territory. As captain, Sixkiller had forty men under his command. Besides this position, Sixkiller also held a commission as a deputy U.S. marshal and a special agent for the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Sixkiller’s duties included policing the streets of Muskogee, one of the most dangerous towns in the “Wild West.” There were more lawmen killed in a fifty mile radius of Muskogee than anywhere west of the Mississippi River during the frontier era.

Sixkiller’s main problems were the whiskey bootleggers, cattle thieves, murders, rapists, timber thieves, land squatters, train robbers, card sharks, and prostitutes servicing the railroad towns. During his six years as captain, Sixkiller was wounded once. It is reported that he killed a bootlegger from Missouri named Solomon Copple. Copple was attempting to peddle whiskey in and around Muskogee. Sixkiller cornered him outside of town. Copple tried to resist arrest and Sixkiller using his pistol, killed him.

The most famous Indian Territory outlaw that Sixkiller subdued was the notorious Creek Freedman, Dick Glass. Glass had a gang that operated throughout the Indian Territory. They stole horses in the Indian nations and exchanged them for illegal whiskey in Texas, bringing the contraband back across the Red River to be sold at a substantial profit. In June of 1885, Sixkiller put a posse together that included the equally renown Indian lawman Charles LeFlore. They set an ambush for Glass and his gang near Colbert in the Chickasaw Nation. The gang had a full supply of whiskey and were northbound. They rode tight into the trap set by the lawmen. Glass pulled his pistol, but caught a full charge from Sixkiller’s shotgun that put him out of action, permanently. The rest of the gang were either killed or arrested shortly thereafter.

On Christmas Eve, 1886, Sixkiller was off duty and unarmed. Feeling a little under the weather, he made a trip to downtown Muskogee to pick up some medicine. He was met by two dastardly malcontents bent on mayhem: Dick Vann and Alf Cunningham. Sixkiller was stepping up on the platform on the north side of the Patterson Mercantile Store. Vann and Cunningham, with a shotgun and pistol, fired on him without notice; supposedly they held a grudge for a previous run-in they had with the lawman. Sixkiller fell to the ground mortally wounded, and Vann and Cunningham made good their escape on fast ponies.

After the death of Captain Sixkiller, the United States legislature passed a bill, signed by the president, which made assault on an Indian federal policeman a federal crime. The document signed March 2, 1887, stated: “…any Indians committing against the person of any Indian policeman appointed under the laws of the United States, or any Indian United states deputy Marshal, any of the following crimes, namely, murder, manslaughter or assault with intent to kill, within the Indian Territory, shall be subjected to the laws of the United States relating to such crimes and shall be tried by the District Court of the United States.” It was a landmark case which increased the stature of Indian police officers in Indian Territory and elsewhere in the United States.

Credit to this story goes to By Art T. Burton from Lest We Forget and also to Legends of America.

 

I hope you enjoy the story as I did. Like I said, I left the story, and history alone, mostly to keep the truth and speculations in history intact, and to give credit to the author. Will I give Sam Sixkiller a spot in the Laramie’s Series, hey we’ll never know until it’s finished.  Happy Trails to all, Happy Monday.

Categories: History, Legend Series, Western | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Cowboy Church, Hey There Pilgrim, Grab Your Bible.

There is a new church in town. It’s a bit different than your grandmaw’s. It’s a Cowboy Church! Instead of suits, ties and winged-tipped shoes, you are likely to see buckles, boots, hats, and jeans. Our method is certainly different but our message is the same ol’ story of Jesus and His love!

The first time I went west, I ended up in Texas, when I got there, I felt I wasn’t going anywhere, and I felt I had nothing left in me.  I found myself in a little church, prayin, and askin for the man upstairs to guide me. I knew I was half good, but am I? Or am I mostly bad? Still struggling with the PTSD, I face everyday, I bring myself to my toughest of times, knowing that things are not ever really bad.
The first I ever heard this song was in that lil cowboy church in Texas, it made me feel like I was home, and finally right where I needed to be. I miss that church, and I miss the west. Only wish I’d had made it to Cheyenne.Maybe the good Lord willin, I will make it there someday, but in the meantime, I will continue living somewhere between Jesus,and John Wayne.

The Purpose of a Cowboy Church is to Impact the Cowboy Culture With the Gospel of Jesus, in hopes to keep the cowboy and cowgirl an honest fella. We continue to prey that we are “Somewhere between a cowboy and a saint, while crossing the open range, and always be somewhere between Jesus, and John Wayne.”
The Cowboy’s Ten Commandments are below, and if ya need a better way of livin’ well pick up yer bible, and head to the Cowboy Church. Live by these simple rules, and trust me, you will remember the experience forever.
Cowboy’s Ten Commandments
 
  1.   Just One God
  2.   Honor yer Ma & Pa
  3.   No Tellin Tales or Gossipin
  4.   Git Yerself to Sunday Meetin
  5.   Put Nothin Before God
  6.   No Foolin Around With Another Fellow’s Gal
  7.   No Killin
  8.   Watch Yer Mouth
  9.   Don’t Take What Ain’t Yers
  10. Don’t Be Hankerin For Yer Buddy’s Stuff

History of Cowboy Church, across America:

Local Christian churches within the cowboy culture  are distinctively Western heritage in character. A typical cowboy church might be in a barn, metal building, arena, sale barn, or old western building, have its own rodeo arena, and a country gospel band. Baptisms are generally done in a stock tank, or waterin troth. The sermons are usually short and simple. Some cowboy churches have covered arenas where rodeo events such as bull riding, team roping, ranch sorting, team penning and equestrian events are held on weeknights. Many cowboy churches have existed throughout the western states for the past forty or fifty years, however just in the past fifteen or so years has there been an explosion of growth within the “movement”. Prior to 1980 there were no less than 5 cowboy churches in Texas, now the number exceeds 200, and there are an estimated 750 nationwide. There has been no definitive group that established the movement; rather it seems to have had a spontaneous beginning in diverse areas of the country at nearly the same time. Some of these cowboy churches are an outgrowth of ministries to professional rodeo or team roping events, while the roots of many can be traced back to ministry events associated with ranch rodeos, ranch horse competitions, chuck wagon cooking competitions, cowboy poetry gatherings and other “cowboy culture” events.

So we hope to see ya, here or there, maybe in church, or on the range. No matter where it is, love thy brother, and treat each and everyone with respect. have pride in yourself, and never give up. God Bless Ya, all. Come on back if yer passin through Amen!

Categories: Cowboy Code, Western | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Sunday Matinee~The Old Chisolm Trail~The Ballad of America

http://borivers.webs.com/The%20Old%20Chisholm%20Trail%20-%20Michael%20Martin%20Murphey.mp3″

The Old Chisolm Trail

Oh come along, boys, and listen to my tale,

I’ll tell you all my troubles on the ol’ Chisholm trail.

(chorus)

Come a-ti yi youpy youpy yea youpy yea

Come a-ti yi youpy youpy yea

I foot in the stirrup  an’ I hand on a- horn,

I’m the  best damned cowboy ever was born.

On a ten dollar horse and a forty dollar saddle,

I goin inta punchin’ Them long horn cattle.

Started up the trail October twenty-third

Started up the trail with the 2-U herd.

Woke up one morning on the Chisholm trail,

With a rope in my hand and a cow by the tail,

I’m up in the morning before daylight,

And before I sleep the moon shine bright.

Oh, it’s cloudy in the west, and a lookin’ like rain,

And my darned old slicker’s in the wagon again.

No chaps, no slicker, and it’s pouring down rain,

And I swear, by God, I’ll never night herd again.

Last night on guard, and the leader broke the ranks,

I hit my horse down the shoulders and spurred him in the flanks.

The  wind began to blow and the rain began to fall,

And it looked by god we was gonna lose ’em all.

Crippled my Horse, an don’t know how

Ropin at the horns of a 2-U cow.

With lighnin in his eye, and thunder in his heal.

He went spinnin round like a houp on a wheel

My hoss throwed me off at the creek called Mud

My hoss throwed me off and I landed with a thud

Last time I saw him he was runnin cross the level,

Kickin up his heals, and runnin like the devil.

We rounded ’em up and put ’em in the cars

And that was the last of the old Two-U Bars.

I went to the boss to get my roll,

Boss had me figured for nine dollars in the hole.

Well me an the boss had a lil spat,

So I hit him in the face with my ten gallon hat.

Well my boss man said, “Well I’ll fire you,

Not only you, but the whole damn crew.

So I sold my horse, and I sold my Saddle,

An’ you can go to hell with your long horn cattle

And I hadn’t been home two days or three,

I put off my gal for to see.

Tammy said “you better quit that cowboy life,

If you ever want to have a pretty little wife.

I’ll sell my saddle, and buy me plow

Swear by god, I’ll never rope another cow.

Texas Confederate soldiers returning home from the Civil War found that in their absence the herds of longhorn cattle they were raising before the war had doubled in size and were now roaming the southern tip of the state unbranded. They were so plentiful that they had little value in Texas, but the industrial cities of the North were booming with immigrant labor and hungry mouths to feed. So began the era of the American cowboy and the great cattle drives, in which cattle were rounded up and herded north into Kansas, Missouri, and Wyoming. There they met the new railroad lines that could carry the meat to the East Coast.

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT9IuHPZWovJqT8E03j0cuVgzqHJ15Yn-yjj1_3uiS_IbuTHYLl

The first trail that was widely used for these long drives was called the Chisholm Trail. By the time the trail fell into disuse in 1882, hundreds of cowboys had driven tens of thousands of cattle up the trail, inventing and singing countless verses to Old Chisholm Trail.

 

See Ya’ll here in the morning, with a little Cowboy Culture.

Categories: Civil War, Cowboy Code, Western | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Western Comics, to the Revisionist

Posted by: Ritchie White @shotgunborivers

DC Comics

For nearly two decades Western Pulp fiction brought us some of the greatest tales of the American frontier, but by the 1960’s it was beginning to die out with the rise of trade paperback. However the Pulp fiction era brought light to new medium, the comic book. A hybrid medium that allowed illustrations and strongly blended written words to convey the story of the illustrations. Even though the comic book era began in 1933, the western comics didn’t become popular until the 1940’s and 50’s, alongside the pulp magazines.  Due to competition of comic books, and other mediums, the aforementioned Pulp Magazine era had died out.

However the western comics would come to life for more than four decades, even after its decline in the 1960’s, western comics would move into the revisionist western. Favoring realism over the famous romanticism as western always portrayed, the western comics spun quickly into a Weird West style. A literary sub-genre that combined elements of the western genre and other literary genres such as science fiction, horror, occult, and fantasy. By the 1970’s characters such as Jonah Hex and Bat Lash were born, and  lived well into the 1990’s.
Western Comics have since stayed alive within the weird western sub-genre in the new century, and have made something of a comeback. They don’t dominate the market by a long shot.  Jonah Hex comes back to life in the All-star Western in The New 52 as late as 2011, and Bat Lash appearing as late as 2006 in comics, and converted to trade paperback in 2008.

To conclude, I have brought you the rich history of the western genre, and where it was born in the past month, to not only share the romanticism of western literature, but to also announce a huge turn in my writing career. As I have been promising the Laramie’s Series, they have taken a bit of a stall. However to my readers, and fellow western genre authors, in the last few months the gears have not stopped turning, nor have any of my ideas. I am glad to finally announce that my career will be taking me on an unexpected detour. I am planning to come forth with a ePulp mini-series magazine titled “Six-Guns and Tomahawks Magazine”  starring Lash Larue once named Akecheta (Souix for “He is Fighter”) a Native American turned outlaw. Coming in March with 6 short stories, and the wonderful art from my new illustration artist Brooke Presley-Caban.

We are also creating another ePulp series as well, which will blow you all away as I bring in a weird western under a developmental name of  “The Dark Rider” an action packed short story series starring Rex Quade, a gunslinger Cowboy brought back from the dead by Native American Indians to avenge a massacre, with a price to pay.

As a reader and writer what are your thoughts on the history of our genre, and the announcement of my changing gears? Comments are welcome.

Categories: Western, Western Authors, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

POOR PEOPLE ?

One day, the father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the country with the express purpose of showing him how poor people live. They spent a couple of days and nights on the farm of what would be considered a very poor family.

On their return from their trip, the father asked his son, ‘How was the trip?’

‘It was great, Dad.’

‘Did you see how poor people live?’ the father asked.

‘Oh yeah,’ said the son.

‘So, tell me, what did you learn from the trip?’ asked the father.

The son answered:

‘I saw that we have one dog and they had four.
We have a pool that reaches to the middle of our garden and they have a creek that has no end. We have imported lanterns in our garden and they have the stars at night. Our patio reaches to the front yard and they have the whole horizon. We have a small piece of land to live on and they have fields that go beyond our sight. We have servants who serve us, but they serve others. We buy our food, but they grow theirs. We have walls around our property to protect us, they have friends to protect them.’

The boy’s father was speechless.

Then his son added, ‘Thanks Dad for showing me how poor we are.’

Isn’t perspective a wonderful thing? Makes you wonder what would happen if we all gave thanks for everything we have, instead of worrying about what we don’t have.

Appreciate every single thing you have, especially your friends!

Pass this on to friends and acquaintances and help them refresh their perspective and appreciation.

‘Life is too short and friends are too few.’

Categories: Writing Technique | 1 Comment

Western ePulp’s the modern pulp magazine, What……..?

Posted by: Ritchie White @shotgunborivers

Pulp magazines were originally published from 1896 through the 1950s. The typical pulp magazine was seven inches wide by ten inches high, half an inch thick, and 128 pages long. Pulps were printed on cheap paper with ragged, untrimmed edges. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Magazines printed on higher quality paper were called “glossies” or “slicks”. In their first decades, pulps were most often priced at ten cents per magazine, while competing slicks were 25 cents apiece. Pulps were the successor to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are best remembered for their lurid and exploitative stories and sensational cover art.

Western Story Magazine was a pulp magazine published by Street & Smith, which ran from 1919 to 1949.It was the first of numerous pulp magazines devoted to Western fiction. In its heyday Western Story Magazine was one of the most successful pulp magazines; in 1921 the magazine was selling over half a million copies each issue.

Western Story Magazine began when Street & Smith executive Henry Ralston decided to convert one of the company’s nickel weeklies, New Buffalo Bill Weekly, into a pulp.  Ralston installed Frank Blackwell as editor of the new magazine. The magazine attracted a number of famous Western authors, including Charles Alden Seltzer, H. Bedford-Jones, Stewart Edward White, W. Ryerson Johnson and William MacLeod Raine. The November 25th, 1920 issue was the first issue to carry the work of Max Brand (writing under the pseudonym George Owen Baxter). Brand’s work would dominate the magazine in the next decade; he would write dozens of stories for Western Story Magazine both under his own name and several pseudonyms. Western Story Magazine was also prominent in publishing material by women writers, including B. M. Bower and Cherry Wilson.

In the 1930s, the publication’s roster of authors expanded to include Walt Coburn, William Colt MacDonald and W. C. Tuttle, while noted pulp illustrator Walter M. Baumhofer contributed several covers.

In the late 1930s, Blackwell was succeeded as editor by John Burr, who edited the magazine until it ceased publication in 1949.  to read more about the original western pulps visit The western Story on pulpmags.org.

https://i0.wp.com/api.ning.com/files/D1*nxuy077RsofWSz5UE-rGqy6yNy--oewMzw6URuDGoHvkP8AgcCHmg0*ALTYoWzU7AnTQas4NaUV*fwYe78zkIupwyzqdh/Vol3cover.jpg

A new chapter in the western pulps has arrived in ePulps, Well what in tarnation is an ePulp?

Well,I’ll tell ya, as explained on Rope and Wire  an ePulp is a western magazine in the style of the old western pulps like, Ace-High, Cowboy Stories or Zane Grey Western Magazine, however in electronic format. Since 2011 Rope and Wire has published four wonderful ePulps. They have the same great covers as the old pulps once did, and new stories come alive once again in each one to tell the traditional style stories of the old west, the danger, suspense, intrigue and deception as they do in Christopher Scott’s Rope and Wire’s Western Short Stories

What does the future hold for ePulp’s, will they continue to make a comeback? I know I plan on reading them, and after doing some research, I may attempt to even write one.

What are thoughts and comments on the ePulp?  Will you read them?

Categories: Western, Western Authors, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Happy New Year 2013 The Beginning

There are far, far better things ahead than any we leave behind- C.S. Lewis

https://i0.wp.com/2.static.guestlistnetwork.com/files/articles/6407_1.jpg

With that said, I want to wish everyone that stops by my blog, and country store, a wonderful and joyous happy new year. I am hoping this year will be a big year in my writing career, as I also wish that your new year brings the same. Thanks, Ritchie “Bo Rivers” White.

Categories: Current Events | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

2012 in review

2012 WordPress annual report, Thanks to all who visited my blog, hope you’ll stop by for a read, or a shootout in 2013.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 3,100 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 5 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

Categories: Current Events | 1 Comment

Dime Novels-The history of the Western

As a western writer, I have been looking back at our history, even before Zane Grey, and Louis L’Amour. What was the first western? and where did we begin?

Personally I would have to say we got our start as many genres did from the Dime Novel era, from 1860 to 1895 the dime novel served as Americas first paperback, and From gun-slinging heroes to mysteries, the dime novel is notably the beginning of genre fiction. This ideology of the dime novel was particularly apparent in Westerns, in which the heroes always won and the villains were always brutally punished.

Some scholars ahttps://i0.wp.com/www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/images/189.1.jpgrgue that dime novel westerns appealed most to young, and working-class men – The mythic West of the cowboy as a place where class boundaries were marked in the industrializing East and the Midwest did not prevail.

Dime novelists helped to popularize the cowboy myth, but as Richard Slotkin notes, he had earlier precedents in American literature – tales about Davy Crockett and Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales.

The cowboy figure arose out of long literary tradition of frontiersmen that informed his character. Richard Slotkin, in Regeneration through Violence, demonstrates the beginnings of the American myth by carefully tracing the early figure, focusing on the influences of John Filson’s creation of Daniel Boone in 1784 and, building on Filson, James Fenimore Cooper’s The Leatherstocking Tales (1823) (importance also noted in Milton 7-9, 84-87).

Interpretation of the dime novel western actually embodies a world in which the values and practices of the pre-industrial order are given renewed life: a place in which machines still stand in gardens and where everyone is a worker.

As Americans began to mourn the “closing of the frontier,” they simultaneously began to celebrate the cowboy, who quickly became the hero of the mythic West.

It may have been the emergence of modern America, with its urbanization and industrialization, that sparked an additional interest among its people for a past that was more direct, more simple, more easily understood

https://i0.wp.com/www.press.uillinois.edu/books/images/9780252033520.jpg

.

The nation had, some held, grown too fast, had lost something in that process; and now there was a yearning to return to that fast-disappearing life, as we know the Cowboy was not always regarded as an American hero. In fact, as late as the 1880s, the were regarded as violent and uncontrollable.

However the Dime Novel was a way to revisit the frontier, and by reading you could simply slip yourself bac

k into a simpler way of life. Today as western authors we spend our time praising the outlaws, and making them hero’s, as well as creating new one’s. We write what the west was about, and bring forth the tales of Buffalo Bill Cody, Wyatt Earp, Doc Holiday, Jesse James, and others, but without the Dime Novel, I think we wouldn’t have the western’s we write today, without the creation of the Dime Novel.

 

Categories: Western, Western Authors, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: