Posts Tagged With: Ken Farmer

Happy Trails Until We Meet Again

This concludes our week long blogathon in honor of the National Day of the Cowboy, and I want to say that it went rather well.

I personally want to thank Steven Law, Ken Farmer, Larry Payne, J.R. Sanders, J.J. Devine, D.B. Jackson, Tyler Brentmore, Mathew Pizzolato, and Phil Dunlap for participating in this weeks Blogathon. We topped over 600 visits this week to honor the National Day of the Cowboy.

I would also like to thank Bethany Braley the founder of National Day of the Cowboy organization,for adding us to the calendar of events, and supporting our purpose as Western Authors, and look forward to helping her get New York, as one of the states to make it official as a day we can celebrate to honor the National Day of the Cowboy.

I also want to thank everyone who stopped by here, and on facebook to read each blog, it was wonderful to have you here on my site, and hope that you will continue to visit from time to time.

The free Ebook giveaway is still up for grabs, so feel free to get your comments in, due to the fact the comments were not at large as I had hoped. I plan on snagging some of the likes and comments from facebook as well. All contest winners will be announced on Sunday, 10 winners will be chosen on Saturday, and 10 on Sunday. Mathew Pizzolato is also running an Ebook giveaway, where he will announce his winners as well. So stay tuned to see if you are a winner. If you have been chosen I will need an email, and an Ebook format, so that I can send the books out Monday Morning, as I ride on over to Kathy Pooler’s Blog krpooler.com to share the heart of a cowboy, which begins a week long book tour.

For blog tour information log onto https://shotgunborivers.com/book-tour/. All the blogs, and websites that I will be featured on will be posted there throughout the weekend, as well as throughout the week. I will be sharing about my second self-published book Rodeo Dayz, a book of short stories, in which nine rodeo contestants share their experience in the rodeo, and a short history in NY that dates back to the early 1950’s, co-written by Donnie Baxter, Leo Martin, and Wayne Martin. I will also be promoting my brand new Ebook Series The Adventures of Laramie Taylor, Laramie’s Code, and Laramie’s War. These Ebooks are about Laramie Taylor’s life before Laramie’s Thunder, The Collins Crew.

I want to also announce our first sponsor in the National Day of the Cowboy blogathon, and book tour Leo and Jen Martin at the Double M Tack shop, and Double M Haunted Hayrides, the home of Scary Harry, an ghostly cowboy that haunts Terror Town with his bandits protecting the gold they stole, before the town demised some time ago. Thank You Jen and Leo for letting me advertise the National Day of the Cowboy blogathon, and the Read ’em Cowboy Barnes and Noble bookfair certificates.

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Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, NDOC, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Symbol of America: The Cowboy

While in my travels of searching for western authors to assist me in celebrating the National Day of the Cowboy, I stumbled onto a gentleman that surely knows his way around a western, not only in writing them, but starring in them as well. I would like to give a good warm welcome to Ken Farmer, or “Deputy Kyle” as in the 1983 film Silverado. Welcome Ken.

Ken Farmer

The Cowboy is just as important to our nation’s heritage as the pilgrims, the revolution and the civil war.  In fact, in many parts of the world, the Old West Cowboy IS the symbol of America. Having been born in the early ‘40s, I grew up with westerns. First the Saturday double feature matinee where we waited for the Durango Kid, Red Ryder, Hoppy serials or The Three Mesquiteers, Tim Holt, Johnny Mack Brown, Gene and Roy movies. Then later on in the ‘50s, there was that little box we called the TV. Yep, grew up with the Cowboy. Didn’t realize at the time, that those movies and TV shows were actually Hollywood’s glamorized version of the Old West.

It wasn’t until I started doing research for writing screenplays that I learned about the “real” Old West—that there weren’t tied-down gun rigs or shoot-outs in the street at high noon. Oh, sure there were gunfighters, bounty hunters mostly who would just as soon shoot you in the back as not or guns for hire. Most gunfights took place at a distance. The dime novels had a great deal to do with the Old West myths, like Wyatt Earp, who, according to actual records and newspaper accounts (excluding his own versions), never killed anyone. Did a lot of pistol-whipping, though. Carried his gun in a leather-lined pocket in his coat, not in a holster. Again, so much for Hollowood.

Deputy US Marshall James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok got a lot of dime novel play that spiced up his reputation, but there was a Deputy US Marshall in the late 1800s that far out-shown Hickok as a lawman. He killed twice as many men in the line of duty as “Wild Bill”, served over 3,000 felony warrants, was never wounded even though he had his hat shot off, his reins shot in two, his gun belt shot off and a button shot off the front of his vest. He served over 32 years as a Deputy US Marshal and is still considered to this day to be the best Deputy US Marshal in the long and storied history of the Marshal’s Service. The reason he didn’t have the notoriety at the time was…he was black. He was a former slave and the first black Deputy US Marshal appointed west of the Mississippi. His name was Bass Reeves.

My writing partner, Buck Stienke and I decided that Bass would be the focus of our first deviation from our modern-day military action series novels about the Black Eagle Force we had been writing. After three Black Eagle Force novels, we decided to do an accurate historical fiction western adapted from a screen play I had written back in the ‘80s called the Tumbleweed Wagon. We elected to title the novel, The Nations.

The synopsis is as follows:

THE NATIONS also known as “Indian Territory”, “Robber’s Roost” and “No-Man’s Land”, was regarded in the latter part

The Nations

of the 19th century as the bloodiest and most dangerous place in the world.  It was a refuge for outlaws men from all over the North American continent. There were only 200 Deputy US Marshals made up of whites, blacks and Indian to police the vast area of 74,000 square miles under Federal Judge Issac C. Parker, known as the hanging judge. The Nations is based on actual cases and is crammed full of excitement, suspense and the everyday humor that develops between men as they live and fight and sometimes die together. From the action and dialogue, the guns, wardrobe and historical authenticity, The Nations paints a story of the Old West  as it really was.

It is the year 1885. A notorious band of outlaws, known as the “Larson Gang”, has been terrorizing Arkansas, Missouri and the Nations for years. When they kill five Deputy Marshals while rescuing Ben Larson, the vicious younger brother of the leader Wes Larson—it is too much for Judge Parker. He orders an all-out concerted effort to capture the Larson Gang and bring them to justice. “If  they will not respect the law; then by God we will make them fear it.”

Black Marshal Bass Reeves, the first black marshal west of the Mississippi, and white Marshals Jack McGann, Tobe Bassett and John L. Patrick recapture the youngest member of the gang, Ben Larson, a true sociopath. Along with two Indian Police, known as Lighthorse, the lawmen begin the treacherous journey to Fort Smith with their prisoners—Preacher Budlow, a gospel quoting, whiskey running and somewhat demented old scalawag, Jed Neal, a tough, but honorable black man mistakenly accused of killing a cowboy on the trail, and Ben—shackled to the bed of the Tumbleweed Wagon.

In the small town of Checotah, the Marshals encounter the Larson gang unexpectedly. A wild gun battle ensues and when the smoke clears, all of the outlaws are dead, except Ben, who does indeed get to Fort Smith to stand trial under Judge Parker.

“It is not the severity of the punishment that is the deterrent… but the certainty of it.” – Judge Issac C. Parker.

The Nations will be released 20 July, look for it. You can order signed copies from Ken & Buck for $14.95 at

http://blackeagleforce.com/buy_now/Do we believe there should be a National Day of the Cowboy? Absolutely! Nothing is more “American” than the Cowboy. ‘Nuff said.

Short Bios of Ken Farmer and Buck Stienke.

Ken Farmer, served in the Marine Corps and graduated from Stephen F. Austin State University. Ken has been a professional actor/director/writer for over forty years with memorable roles in Silverado, Friday Night Lights and The Newton Boys, wrote and directed Rockabilly Baby. He was also the OC an VO spokesman for Wolf Brand Chili for over eight years and participated in the Ben Johnson Pro-Celebrity Rodeos until Ben’s death in ‘96.

            Buck Stienke is a former fighter pilot and retired captain from Delta Airlines. A graduate of the Air Force Academy, he was also executive producer for the award-winning film Rockabilly Baby and co-author of five novels with Ken Farmer.

http://www.facebook.com/TheNationsNovel

http://www.blackeagleforce.com

Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, NDOC, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

I want to thank My long time Best Friend Tim Bultman for joining our cause to support the National Day of the Cowboy. There have been many of times Tim has helped me along the way, and to me he is a true cowboy, and friend. PALS

Cowboy With A Cause

I am proud to announce that I have joined my long time friend Shotgun Bo Rivers “Ritchie White” for supporting the National Day of the Cowboy, and will be hosting blogs on my website all week next week alongside my PAL.

As Cowboys, our way of life means a lot to us, our code is what we follow each and everyday, many have said that the Cowboy is a dying breed, however I am just one cowboy that says we are here to stay.

We are in your homes on ESPN when you tune in to watch the NFR’s. or at a small town rodeo on Friday nights. We are your guide, when you vacation at a dude ranch, and most of us that live the life of a cowboy know we are still here, and our heritage is here to stay along with us.

Sure we may travel is…

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Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

National Day of the Cowboy Blogathon, and giveaway

July 28th marks the 8th Annual National Day of the Cowboy, as a western writer and author I am announcing some exciting news that I will be contributing to this great and wonderful day of preservation of  America’s Cowboy heritage by having a Ebook giveaway of two short stories. Laramie’s Thunder is coming along very well, but I want my audience to know my character, Laramie Taylor, so I am going to be giving his first adventures away all day on July 28th and 29th.
 Also Most importantly I will be guest hosting  other western authors all that week beginning July 23rd, with there story about The Old West Cowboy, and their feelings on the NDOC becoming a national Day, as well as sharing their blogs, books, and material with you. Some authors that will be attending are Ken Farmer, Tyler Brentmore, Larry Payne, J.J. Devine, Phil Dunlop, Matt Pizzolato, and Steven Law. My intention is to honor them as cowboys, and cowgirls, and honor their wonderful work and contributions to the western heritage, and the American cowboy.
I am also working hand in hand with the NDOC blog, and organization, and am hoping to come up with something very special for my readers, the American Cowboy, and my new western writer PALS above that I have become rather acquainted with in recent months. Blogs will be appearing here on shotgunborivers.com, cowboywithacause.com, and possibly http://nationaldayofthecowboy.com/wordpress/, as well as links posted at each authors blog.

Following the NDOC week I will be launching my August Blog Book tour where I will be promoting my book Rodeo Dayz, and the first two Ebooks “The First Adventures of Laramie Taylor Laramie’s Code”. So join us all in a week long celebration,  as we celebrate the heritage of the American cowboy, and honor some of the greatest men and women who pioneered the Old West.

On Saturday July28th and Sunday 29th 10 winners will be picked each day at random from comments, and reviews of the weeks blogs and given the first two Ebooks of  “The First Adventures of Laramie Taylor Laramie’s Code” a ten short story book series to begin in July.

 

We are looking forward to helping with this great celebration, and  hope to help make NDOC a national day celebrated everywhere. Until then, Happy Trails.
Categories: Current Events, Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Western Genre a New Rising.

I am a western fiction writer/author, and I spend a great deal of time just researching the western genre, and what I read about our genre is more on the dying side than on the rise. I would like to ensure that our genre has not died; in fact, I believe that it is making its new rising.

The Legend of Hell's Gate: An American Conspiracy

I read today, a blog posted last November about the western genre dying titled The Slow Death of the Western Genre (in honor of BigBlackHatMan) which you can read from the link provided. The article began to say that there were very few western genre films in the 90’s, and the western genre began to die off in the 80’s, unless it was a crossover. Disgruntled with knowing it was not very true I did some searching of my own, and in my search, I found several movies, which the blog author failed to mention, as well as the people that commented on the post as well.

I began with the big screen and yes, it starts where our blogger left off at Back to the Future III, which was a crossover western, yet many western films were not mentioned. Movies  like Dances with Wolves, Quigley Down Under, Young Guns II, The Last of the Mohicans, Unforgiven, Tombstone, Rio Diablo, Frank and Jesse, Legends of the Fall, Wyatt Earp, Desperado, Wild Bill, Riders of Purple Sage, Gunfighter, Purgatory, as well as Silverado starring actor/author, and a new found pal Ken Farmer, and this list goes on and on. Did we forget about Emilio Estevez, and his boyish looks as Billy the Kid, and certainly forgot about Kurt Russell in Tombstone, and Kevin Costner in Wyatt Earp.

Young Guns II

This is why it disgruntled me so much that so many Western films have come into the late 20th and 21st century as well and not even thought of by the author while writing this blog. Written in 2011, I was amazed that neither he nor any of the comments mentioned 3:10 to Yuma, or Jeff Bridges in an awesome performance in the remake of John Wayne’s True Grit.  Counting from 2000 to 2012, I have counted nearly a dozen westerns that were solely of the old west, which proves, the Old West is not in the grave just yet, with a new film just  released March 3oth, 2012 The Legend of Hell’s Gate: An American Conspiracy.

As a western writer, and author I wanted to include Western Fiction books, I see countless books published in the western genre all of the time, from titles like Yuma Gold by Steven Law, and The Devil in a Bottle by Carol Buchanan, as well as so many others, I could spend days just listing them . Even coming into a digital age not long ago, I can count dozens of western books available on Kindle, the IBook store, and Nooks, which brings a completely new breed of some great western genre authors.

Also noted in the blog above was the fact that the reason not many were interested in the genre anymore was the age of space, and fantasy, and yes possibly the age of space, science fiction, and fantasy has taken us by storm. Maybe if Jeff Bridges Sparkled in True Grit, we might just get the media to agree we as a genre are still on the rise.

The Pony Express

Our history is built from the Old West, and without it, there would be no Boomtowns, which led to a railroad and later Hollywood, so why not keep it alive, has the media forgotten, that media itself originated by means of The Pony Express, which has a rich history in itself in the Old West. I think they should look our way more often than they do, and notice that we are a rising genre as like any other genre. It seems we are only in the mainstream media when it is to review us as a dying entity, yet more and more westerns have come, and are coming.

Here on Shotgun Bo Rivers Blog, the Old West will never die; at least while I am alive and kickin, here at Bo’s place there will always be a spot for a good western genre story, book, or movie.

Categories: Current Events, Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

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