Posts Tagged With: Marshal

Curly Bill Kills Marshal Fred White 133 years ago.

A drunken William Brocius Graham, known better as “Curly Bill” Brocius, killed Tombstone, Arizona Territory Marshal Fred White on this date October 28th 1880, when White tried to arrest him. Marshal Fred White encountered Brocius at the East end of town, on a dark street in a vacant lot where the Birdcage Theater now stands. Brocius was intoxicated and he and his companions were firing pistols into the air. It is speculated that the pistol’s hammer was “half-cocked” over a live round (it was later found to have contained six live rounds,) and when White grabbed the barrel and pulled, the weapon, it discharged, shooting White in the groin area. Wyatt Earp, who saw the shooting and flash but could not clearly see the action in the dark. However Wyatt pistol-whipped Brocius, knocking him unconscious, and arrested him.  When the new day dawned, the rowdy makers went before the judge, were fined for violating city ordinances, and released. Brocius; however, asked for a postponement until he could get a lawyer. Later he appeared with Judge Haynes of Tucson, as his counsel, and as a lynch mob was forming in the camp to hang Brocius for the shooting of the popular marshal, whose condition had worsened and looked as if he might die, Brocius was ordered to be taken to Tucson to be held in protective custody. As Wyatt Earp and George Collins headed to Tucson with Brocius in a buggy, they were escorted out of town by Virgil and Morgan Earp.Brocius was said to have terribly regretted the shooting of White, whom he apparently liked. White lingered for two days, dying on October 30th. However, prior to his death, he gave testimony that ultimately led to Brocius being cleared of any wrongdoing. White stated that the pistol fired accidentally, and that Brocius, intoxicated, evidently did not realize his pistol was cocked. Despite his regret, Brocius did not accept being pistol-whipped by Wyatt Earp during his arrest. This was a factor that led to increasing tensions between the Earps and the Cow-boy element. Unlike recent Hollywood portrayals of White as an older man, the first Marshal of Tombstone, was only 31 or 32 when he died.

Brocius was eventually acquitted of any any wrong-doing, with Judge Nuegass commenting that the shooting was “Homocide by Misadventure” or, in other words, an accident. Brocius was released from custody and despite Wyatt’s statement that helped him to be freed, Brocius could not forgive Wyatt for the pistol whipping. This was just one more of the many incidents that increased the ever mounting tension between the Earps and the Cowboy faction.

Some claim that the Ghost of Fred White still haunts the street where he was shot. https://borivers.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/99feb-tombstoneallenstreet1882-500.jpg

The next day the Tombstone Epitaph read “About 12:30 last night a series of pistol shots startled the late goers on the streets, and visions of funerals, etc., flitted through the brain of the Epitaph local, and the result proved that his surmises were correct.  The result in a few words is as follows: A lot of Texas cow boys, as they are called, began firing at the moon and stars on Allen street near Sixth, City Marshal White, who happened to be in the neighborhood, interfered to prevent violation of the city ordinance, and was ruthlessly shot by one of the number.  Deputy Sheriff Earp, who is ever to the front when duty calls, arrived just in the nick of time.  Seeing the Marshal fall, he promptly knocked his assailant down with a six shooter and as promptly locked him up; and with the assistance of his brothers Virgil and Morgan went in pursuit of the others.  That he found them, an inventory of the City Prison this mourning will testify.  Marshal White was shot in the left groin, the ball passing nearly through, and being cut from the buttock by Dr. Matthews.  The wound is a serious though not fatal one.  Too much praise cannot be given to the Marshal for his gallant attempt to arrest the violators of the ordinance, nor to Deputy Sheriff Earp and his brothers for the energy displayed in bringing in the malefactors to arrest.  At last accounts, 3 p.m., Marshal White was sleeping, and strong hopes of his ultimate recovery were expected.”
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Categories: History, Western, Western Authors | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wyatt Earp’s Revenge VS. Laramie’s Thunder

I am glad that a friend recommended this new movie Wyatt Earp’s Revenge, if you have not seen it yet, I urge you do.

For starters, watching Revenge brought me back to “Tombstone” which also starred Val Kilmer, and had me thinking, what would be different if Kurt Russell were Doc Holliday, and Val Kilmer Wyatt? as in “Wyatt Earp’s Revenge“.

One of the reasons I liked this movie the most is, the story tells about Wyatt’s past in Dodge City, when most of the movies and books we see about Wyatt Earp concentrates on Tombstone, and the Vendetta Ride, which is what he is most famous for. However there is so much more that happened in Wyatt’s life, things that led him to Tombstone in the first place, and why he left Dodge City to begin with.

I also liked the movies twist of the young boy coming back as an inquisitive reporter to discredit Wyatt, because of his father’s death at the hand of Spike Kennedy, and blaming Wyatt for his death, although to the boy’s surprise Wyatt telling him the whole story changed his mind about the blame he placed and the how he felt about his loss.

Secondly having a movie such as this helps me with my novel Laramie’s Thunder, because I found so many similarities in my book, and in the theme of this film.

In relation to Laramie’s Thunder, this movie is rather close in the story line and themes.  My Main character Texas Ranger Laramie Taylor leaves his post in Garrett, TX to avenge his father’s death in Oak Valley, TX. Going against the law and turning renegade outlaw to bring in the outlaw, one of the many themes within my novel.

Another similarity is the friendships, other lawmen to join Wyatt’s Cause in seeking revenge, which taps in to Laramie’s Thunder with Fellow Texas Ranger John Quintin and four ruthless Cherokee Indians joining the Taylor’s in a three state manhunt for the Collins’ Crew, and always being there to aid Laramie, as Bat Masterson, Charlie Basset, and Bill Tillman do in Wyatt Earp’s Revenge.

“If you’re determined to ride into the gates of Hades itself, I’m gonna ride by your side!”

In addition to those similarities, the main themes of Wyatt Earp’s Revenge and Laramie’s Thunder are very close. Any man would do anything for someone he cares about, or Loves. Wyatt turned in his badge to hunt his beloved Dora’s killer down,  and In Laramie’s Thunder; Laramie swears vengeance on anyone involved with the Collins’ Crew, they killed his father in a bank job gone badly, and they have to hang for it. If they don’t he will kill them in retribution for his father. Against all odds Laramie Taylor and Wyatt Earp will ride to the ends of the earth for their vengeance, at no consequence to the law, they are the law, and if the law won’t make them pay, then they will.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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