Posts Tagged With: rodeo

Cowboy Church, Hey There Pilgrim, Grab Your Bible.

There is a new church in town. It’s a bit different than your grandmaw’s. It’s a Cowboy Church! Instead of suits, ties and winged-tipped shoes, you are likely to see buckles, boots, hats, and jeans. Our method is certainly different but our message is the same ol’ story of Jesus and His love!

The first time I went west, I ended up in Texas, when I got there, I felt I wasn’t going anywhere, and I felt I had nothing left in me.  I found myself in a little church, prayin, and askin for the man upstairs to guide me. I knew I was half good, but am I? Or am I mostly bad? Still struggling with the PTSD, I face everyday, I bring myself to my toughest of times, knowing that things are not ever really bad.
The first I ever heard this song was in that lil cowboy church in Texas, it made me feel like I was home, and finally right where I needed to be. I miss that church, and I miss the west. Only wish I’d had made it to Cheyenne.Maybe the good Lord willin, I will make it there someday, but in the meantime, I will continue living somewhere between Jesus,and John Wayne.

The Purpose of a Cowboy Church is to Impact the Cowboy Culture With the Gospel of Jesus, in hopes to keep the cowboy and cowgirl an honest fella. We continue to prey that we are “Somewhere between a cowboy and a saint, while crossing the open range, and always be somewhere between Jesus, and John Wayne.”
The Cowboy’s Ten Commandments are below, and if ya need a better way of livin’ well pick up yer bible, and head to the Cowboy Church. Live by these simple rules, and trust me, you will remember the experience forever.
Cowboy’s Ten Commandments
 
  1.   Just One God
  2.   Honor yer Ma & Pa
  3.   No Tellin Tales or Gossipin
  4.   Git Yerself to Sunday Meetin
  5.   Put Nothin Before God
  6.   No Foolin Around With Another Fellow’s Gal
  7.   No Killin
  8.   Watch Yer Mouth
  9.   Don’t Take What Ain’t Yers
  10. Don’t Be Hankerin For Yer Buddy’s Stuff

History of Cowboy Church, across America:

Local Christian churches within the cowboy culture  are distinctively Western heritage in character. A typical cowboy church might be in a barn, metal building, arena, sale barn, or old western building, have its own rodeo arena, and a country gospel band. Baptisms are generally done in a stock tank, or waterin troth. The sermons are usually short and simple. Some cowboy churches have covered arenas where rodeo events such as bull riding, team roping, ranch sorting, team penning and equestrian events are held on weeknights. Many cowboy churches have existed throughout the western states for the past forty or fifty years, however just in the past fifteen or so years has there been an explosion of growth within the “movement”. Prior to 1980 there were no less than 5 cowboy churches in Texas, now the number exceeds 200, and there are an estimated 750 nationwide. There has been no definitive group that established the movement; rather it seems to have had a spontaneous beginning in diverse areas of the country at nearly the same time. Some of these cowboy churches are an outgrowth of ministries to professional rodeo or team roping events, while the roots of many can be traced back to ministry events associated with ranch rodeos, ranch horse competitions, chuck wagon cooking competitions, cowboy poetry gatherings and other “cowboy culture” events.

So we hope to see ya, here or there, maybe in church, or on the range. No matter where it is, love thy brother, and treat each and everyone with respect. have pride in yourself, and never give up. God Bless Ya, all. Come on back if yer passin through Amen!

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Categories: Cowboy Code, Western | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

A Friend, A Father, and A Dang Good Cowboy.

Posted by: Ritchie White @shotgunborivers

A good friend of mine watoms hit by a drunk driver on November 30th in Charlton, NY. I wanted to take the time to pray for him, and wish him well, and his family all the best in his recovery. It will surely be a long road ahead for him and his family. Tom is a Rodeo Cowboy, and like me former military. He is a former Marine (RECON 3rd Batt.,First Marines, 1st Mar.Div) He lives a simple life and has three wonderful daughters, Katelyn, Jaimy and Faith, and a whole lotta family and friends that are rooting for him to get better. He lives by the cowboy’s Code and one simple philosophy. “Work Hard, Do Your Best, Keep Your Word, Never Get Too Big For Your Britches, Trust In God and Never Forget a Friend, and I am a lesbian trapped in a mans body.”

Below is the newspaper Article that was written in the Saratogian Dec. 01 2012 Edition

Dec, 01 2012 CHARLTON — A man remains in critical condition in a medically induced coma after a drunken driver allegedly ran a stop sign and crashed into his car Friday evening, sheriff’s deputies said.

Traci L. Briskin, 38, of Clifton Park Center Road in Clifton Park was charged with driving while intoxicated, a misdemeanor, after the accident. She was later released.

Saratoga County sheriff’s deputies say Briskin ran a stop sign at the intersection of Route 67 and Jockey Street in November 3oth.

He was airlifted to Albany Medical Center with internal injuries.

Baker’s daughter contacted The Saratogian Saturday evening and reported he is “not doing well at all,” is on life support and underwent multiple surgeries as of about 5 p.m. She said Baker was on his way home from work when he was hit.

The accident remains under investigation.

cowboy druck driving ribbon

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I have checked in with Katelyn his daughter every day since the accident to get an update on his recovery and this is what she has told everyone yesterday afternoon.

“Update on my Father Tom Baker : over the past couple of days his numbers have been remaining low and his ct scans looked decent so doctors gradually took him off sedation, a few hours afterwards his ICP’s were raising well above where we want them so doctors put him back on sedation to ease the pressure and relax his body. Although it seems like a large setback his body is just not ready and he is very anxious and stressed so they want to give him more time to rest and heal. We will be sure to inform everyone when they decide to start taking the sedation back off and the status of the long journey ahead of us. It is so nice to hear from all the people who care and love my father and I appreciate the thoughts and prayers sent our way. ♥”

Either way Tom, Get better, and remember to Cowboy Up, hang in there, and I share my Prayers with you and your family. Thanks for being a PAL Ritchie.

tombr

And remember;

Before you judge a person, walk a mile in their shoes.
That way, if they get mad, you’ll be a mile away
and you’ll have their shoes.

I am asking some good Rodeo Cowboys to drop a line and say hi, Tom fought for our country, and he deserves a fair shake.

“Whatever you do don’t let go
It’s time to be a cowboy don’t you know
If you get through this you got it whipped
But till you hear the whistle blow
Whatever you do
Don’t let go”
-Justin Mcbride ©2009
Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, Military, Rodeo | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Sharing the Heart of a Cowboy

Today begins my blog book tour, visit krpooler.com as I share the heart of a Cowboy.

My Last Bronc Ride at Double M Rodeo in 2007

I was recently asked what makes me who I am, what is instilled inside my heart? And why did I choose the life I have, and I must tell you from the beginning that it isn’t what I chose to do, or what led me to it at all. It simply chose me; I was born with it inside of me, a fire of burning ember that continues to burn, more and more every day.

As a teenager, I discovered rodeo and found that if I took just one chance, just one ride, I would know for sure, but at the time I had no idea what was in store for me. To look back, I would have not changed a thing;……………..Read More  at krpooler.com

For more information on my book blog tour please visit https://shotgunborivers.com/book-tour/

Categories: Cowboy Code, Rodeo, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Happy Trails Until We Meet Again

This concludes our week long blogathon in honor of the National Day of the Cowboy, and I want to say that it went rather well.

I personally want to thank Steven Law, Ken Farmer, Larry Payne, J.R. Sanders, J.J. Devine, D.B. Jackson, Tyler Brentmore, Mathew Pizzolato, and Phil Dunlap for participating in this weeks Blogathon. We topped over 600 visits this week to honor the National Day of the Cowboy.

I would also like to thank Bethany Braley the founder of National Day of the Cowboy organization,for adding us to the calendar of events, and supporting our purpose as Western Authors, and look forward to helping her get New York, as one of the states to make it official as a day we can celebrate to honor the National Day of the Cowboy.

I also want to thank everyone who stopped by here, and on facebook to read each blog, it was wonderful to have you here on my site, and hope that you will continue to visit from time to time.

The free Ebook giveaway is still up for grabs, so feel free to get your comments in, due to the fact the comments were not at large as I had hoped. I plan on snagging some of the likes and comments from facebook as well. All contest winners will be announced on Sunday, 10 winners will be chosen on Saturday, and 10 on Sunday. Mathew Pizzolato is also running an Ebook giveaway, where he will announce his winners as well. So stay tuned to see if you are a winner. If you have been chosen I will need an email, and an Ebook format, so that I can send the books out Monday Morning, as I ride on over to Kathy Pooler’s Blog krpooler.com to share the heart of a cowboy, which begins a week long book tour.

For blog tour information log onto https://shotgunborivers.com/book-tour/. All the blogs, and websites that I will be featured on will be posted there throughout the weekend, as well as throughout the week. I will be sharing about my second self-published book Rodeo Dayz, a book of short stories, in which nine rodeo contestants share their experience in the rodeo, and a short history in NY that dates back to the early 1950’s, co-written by Donnie Baxter, Leo Martin, and Wayne Martin. I will also be promoting my brand new Ebook Series The Adventures of Laramie Taylor, Laramie’s Code, and Laramie’s War. These Ebooks are about Laramie Taylor’s life before Laramie’s Thunder, The Collins Crew.

I want to also announce our first sponsor in the National Day of the Cowboy blogathon, and book tour Leo and Jen Martin at the Double M Tack shop, and Double M Haunted Hayrides, the home of Scary Harry, an ghostly cowboy that haunts Terror Town with his bandits protecting the gold they stole, before the town demised some time ago. Thank You Jen and Leo for letting me advertise the National Day of the Cowboy blogathon, and the Read ’em Cowboy Barnes and Noble bookfair certificates.

Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, NDOC, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Symbol of America: The Cowboy

While in my travels of searching for western authors to assist me in celebrating the National Day of the Cowboy, I stumbled onto a gentleman that surely knows his way around a western, not only in writing them, but starring in them as well. I would like to give a good warm welcome to Ken Farmer, or “Deputy Kyle” as in the 1983 film Silverado. Welcome Ken.

Ken Farmer

The Cowboy is just as important to our nation’s heritage as the pilgrims, the revolution and the civil war.  In fact, in many parts of the world, the Old West Cowboy IS the symbol of America. Having been born in the early ‘40s, I grew up with westerns. First the Saturday double feature matinee where we waited for the Durango Kid, Red Ryder, Hoppy serials or The Three Mesquiteers, Tim Holt, Johnny Mack Brown, Gene and Roy movies. Then later on in the ‘50s, there was that little box we called the TV. Yep, grew up with the Cowboy. Didn’t realize at the time, that those movies and TV shows were actually Hollywood’s glamorized version of the Old West.

It wasn’t until I started doing research for writing screenplays that I learned about the “real” Old West—that there weren’t tied-down gun rigs or shoot-outs in the street at high noon. Oh, sure there were gunfighters, bounty hunters mostly who would just as soon shoot you in the back as not or guns for hire. Most gunfights took place at a distance. The dime novels had a great deal to do with the Old West myths, like Wyatt Earp, who, according to actual records and newspaper accounts (excluding his own versions), never killed anyone. Did a lot of pistol-whipping, though. Carried his gun in a leather-lined pocket in his coat, not in a holster. Again, so much for Hollowood.

Deputy US Marshall James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok got a lot of dime novel play that spiced up his reputation, but there was a Deputy US Marshall in the late 1800s that far out-shown Hickok as a lawman. He killed twice as many men in the line of duty as “Wild Bill”, served over 3,000 felony warrants, was never wounded even though he had his hat shot off, his reins shot in two, his gun belt shot off and a button shot off the front of his vest. He served over 32 years as a Deputy US Marshal and is still considered to this day to be the best Deputy US Marshal in the long and storied history of the Marshal’s Service. The reason he didn’t have the notoriety at the time was…he was black. He was a former slave and the first black Deputy US Marshal appointed west of the Mississippi. His name was Bass Reeves.

My writing partner, Buck Stienke and I decided that Bass would be the focus of our first deviation from our modern-day military action series novels about the Black Eagle Force we had been writing. After three Black Eagle Force novels, we decided to do an accurate historical fiction western adapted from a screen play I had written back in the ‘80s called the Tumbleweed Wagon. We elected to title the novel, The Nations.

The synopsis is as follows:

THE NATIONS also known as “Indian Territory”, “Robber’s Roost” and “No-Man’s Land”, was regarded in the latter part

The Nations

of the 19th century as the bloodiest and most dangerous place in the world.  It was a refuge for outlaws men from all over the North American continent. There were only 200 Deputy US Marshals made up of whites, blacks and Indian to police the vast area of 74,000 square miles under Federal Judge Issac C. Parker, known as the hanging judge. The Nations is based on actual cases and is crammed full of excitement, suspense and the everyday humor that develops between men as they live and fight and sometimes die together. From the action and dialogue, the guns, wardrobe and historical authenticity, The Nations paints a story of the Old West  as it really was.

It is the year 1885. A notorious band of outlaws, known as the “Larson Gang”, has been terrorizing Arkansas, Missouri and the Nations for years. When they kill five Deputy Marshals while rescuing Ben Larson, the vicious younger brother of the leader Wes Larson—it is too much for Judge Parker. He orders an all-out concerted effort to capture the Larson Gang and bring them to justice. “If  they will not respect the law; then by God we will make them fear it.”

Black Marshal Bass Reeves, the first black marshal west of the Mississippi, and white Marshals Jack McGann, Tobe Bassett and John L. Patrick recapture the youngest member of the gang, Ben Larson, a true sociopath. Along with two Indian Police, known as Lighthorse, the lawmen begin the treacherous journey to Fort Smith with their prisoners—Preacher Budlow, a gospel quoting, whiskey running and somewhat demented old scalawag, Jed Neal, a tough, but honorable black man mistakenly accused of killing a cowboy on the trail, and Ben—shackled to the bed of the Tumbleweed Wagon.

In the small town of Checotah, the Marshals encounter the Larson gang unexpectedly. A wild gun battle ensues and when the smoke clears, all of the outlaws are dead, except Ben, who does indeed get to Fort Smith to stand trial under Judge Parker.

“It is not the severity of the punishment that is the deterrent… but the certainty of it.” – Judge Issac C. Parker.

The Nations will be released 20 July, look for it. You can order signed copies from Ken & Buck for $14.95 at

http://blackeagleforce.com/buy_now/Do we believe there should be a National Day of the Cowboy? Absolutely! Nothing is more “American” than the Cowboy. ‘Nuff said.

Short Bios of Ken Farmer and Buck Stienke.

Ken Farmer, served in the Marine Corps and graduated from Stephen F. Austin State University. Ken has been a professional actor/director/writer for over forty years with memorable roles in Silverado, Friday Night Lights and The Newton Boys, wrote and directed Rockabilly Baby. He was also the OC an VO spokesman for Wolf Brand Chili for over eight years and participated in the Ben Johnson Pro-Celebrity Rodeos until Ben’s death in ‘96.

            Buck Stienke is a former fighter pilot and retired captain from Delta Airlines. A graduate of the Air Force Academy, he was also executive producer for the award-winning film Rockabilly Baby and co-author of five novels with Ken Farmer.

http://www.facebook.com/TheNationsNovel

http://www.blackeagleforce.com

Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, NDOC, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

I want to thank My long time Best Friend Tim Bultman for joining our cause to support the National Day of the Cowboy. There have been many of times Tim has helped me along the way, and to me he is a true cowboy, and friend. PALS

Cowboy With A Cause

I am proud to announce that I have joined my long time friend Shotgun Bo Rivers “Ritchie White” for supporting the National Day of the Cowboy, and will be hosting blogs on my website all week next week alongside my PAL.

As Cowboys, our way of life means a lot to us, our code is what we follow each and everyday, many have said that the Cowboy is a dying breed, however I am just one cowboy that says we are here to stay.

We are in your homes on ESPN when you tune in to watch the NFR’s. or at a small town rodeo on Friday nights. We are your guide, when you vacation at a dude ranch, and most of us that live the life of a cowboy know we are still here, and our heritage is here to stay along with us.

Sure we may travel is…

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Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Vote for “My Gutsy Story, One Crazy 8 Second Ride”

 “just once, I told myself, just once.”

My Gutsy story was featured on Sonia Marsh’s blog Gutsy Living, visit soniamarsh.com
to vote for “My Gutsy Story, One Crazy 8 Second Ride”. Voting is from May 3rd until May 16th, at midnight, PST, you can vote for your favorite April 2012, “My Gutsy Story.”
Also feel free to read, and comment on my story as well. Thank you so much, to all.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Breaking News! Louis L’Amour Was Not the Last Western Writer

I snagged the title for this blog from oldwestnewwest.com a great site for all things about western writers.

The reason I did, is because I keep hearing that same ole thing, just like many other western writers do, “Too bad Louis L’Amour’s gone. Nobody writes Westerns any more.”

However, we are writing westerns, many of us in fact. a small list of authors like W.R. Benton, Steven Law, Peter Brandvold, and Howard Hopkins come to mind, even myself.

The idea for this blog post came to me in a comment made on my Facebook wall, and I say this with all respect, and I quote “Unless you change it to Louis L’Amour no one will know who the new one is anyway.” which was in reference to a question, I asked about using a pen name for my western novels. This statement got me thinking, yes we all know Louis L’Amour, and at this point in my life not many have heard of me as an Author at this point,under my birth name or any pen name, but wasn’t there a time in 1951 that the public had not yet heard of Louis L’Amour and “Westward The Tide?” So it would stand to reason why people haven’t heard of me or will not know who I am when Laramie’s Thunder is first published either, I actually expect that at first, however with the several stories I have laid out to follow my first western, hopefully I will draw in some good readers, and prove that I am a western writer of the old frontier. I already know, I am not Louis, and I am certainly not Zane Grey either, but if you mix the two together, well in a simple kind of way you will be able to say that I can write among them as a western writer and author.

You see it started for me long ago, the first time I felt a that wild west wind blow through me, I was just 15 and was beginning a chapter in my life that later I would pursue as my adventures across the country. Rodeo season had begun, and a friend asked if I wanted to try to ride a bull, it sounded great so I had to give it a try, what I didn’t realize was that after I got up off the ground, tasting the arena dirt for the first time, and dusting off my wrangler jeans I looked out into the crowd, and I saw the great unknown, the desert sands under pounding hooves chasing after a band of outlaws, with a six-shooter and a horse as fast as you could see. At first I knew it was only my imagination running wild, but as time went on, I learned many things about myself, not only was I a modern-day cowboy, but something else entirely. The love of the old west always left me to wonder what could have been, why wasn’t I born a hundred years ago, and where do these visions keep coming from. It was simple I needed to tell these stories, write them down, and explore across the great divide, see as a writer, I live the story as my readers are reading it, and with each description, I show what I have dreamed about for the last decade, and show you from the beginning what I saw that one summer night as I looked out into the cheering audience.

So I hope that no matter what name I choose, you will see the west as I do, and see that western writing is here to stay. It is a part of our history whether it is fiction, or non-fiction, the western genre tells the story of what it was like, to live in a time where there were few rules, an open range and a six-shooter was judge and jury.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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