Posts Tagged With: western genre

Western ePulp’s the modern pulp magazine, What……..?

Posted by: Ritchie White @shotgunborivers

Pulp magazines were originally published from 1896 through the 1950s. The typical pulp magazine was seven inches wide by ten inches high, half an inch thick, and 128 pages long. Pulps were printed on cheap paper with ragged, untrimmed edges. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Magazines printed on higher quality paper were called “glossies” or “slicks”. In their first decades, pulps were most often priced at ten cents per magazine, while competing slicks were 25 cents apiece. Pulps were the successor to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are best remembered for their lurid and exploitative stories and sensational cover art.

Western Story Magazine was a pulp magazine published by Street & Smith, which ran from 1919 to 1949.It was the first of numerous pulp magazines devoted to Western fiction. In its heyday Western Story Magazine was one of the most successful pulp magazines; in 1921 the magazine was selling over half a million copies each issue.

Western Story Magazine began when Street & Smith executive Henry Ralston decided to convert one of the company’s nickel weeklies, New Buffalo Bill Weekly, into a pulp.  Ralston installed Frank Blackwell as editor of the new magazine. The magazine attracted a number of famous Western authors, including Charles Alden Seltzer, H. Bedford-Jones, Stewart Edward White, W. Ryerson Johnson and William MacLeod Raine. The November 25th, 1920 issue was the first issue to carry the work of Max Brand (writing under the pseudonym George Owen Baxter). Brand’s work would dominate the magazine in the next decade; he would write dozens of stories for Western Story Magazine both under his own name and several pseudonyms. Western Story Magazine was also prominent in publishing material by women writers, including B. M. Bower and Cherry Wilson.

In the 1930s, the publication’s roster of authors expanded to include Walt Coburn, William Colt MacDonald and W. C. Tuttle, while noted pulp illustrator Walter M. Baumhofer contributed several covers.

In the late 1930s, Blackwell was succeeded as editor by John Burr, who edited the magazine until it ceased publication in 1949.  to read more about the original western pulps visit The western Story on pulpmags.org.

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A new chapter in the western pulps has arrived in ePulps, Well what in tarnation is an ePulp?

Well,I’ll tell ya, as explained on Rope and Wire  an ePulp is a western magazine in the style of the old western pulps like, Ace-High, Cowboy Stories or Zane Grey Western Magazine, however in electronic format. Since 2011 Rope and Wire has published four wonderful ePulps. They have the same great covers as the old pulps once did, and new stories come alive once again in each one to tell the traditional style stories of the old west, the danger, suspense, intrigue and deception as they do in Christopher Scott’s Rope and Wire’s Western Short Stories

What does the future hold for ePulp’s, will they continue to make a comeback? I know I plan on reading them, and after doing some research, I may attempt to even write one.

What are thoughts and comments on the ePulp?  Will you read them?

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Categories: Western, Western Authors, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Heroes and Antiheroes in Westerns (Guest Post By Mathew Pizzolato)

We all have our heroes, some mystical, others superheroes, but me it was the outlaws and lawmen of the Old West. As an adult I still have those heroes, and in having them it fuels me to write at my best. Today as Matthew Pizzolato launches his book release  for Outlaw, he stops by to tell us who his heroes are, and compares heroes to anti-heroes in westerns. Welcome Matthew, thanks for dropping by.

“As you get older it is harder to have heroes, but it is sort of necessary.”
Ernest Hemingway

Western Author Matthew Pizzolato

I think that every child needs to have direction in life, something to emulate and admire and to strive to be.  Quite frankly, everyone needs heroes.  As a young man, I found my heroes by reading Westerns.

Mostly, I read Louis L’Amour but I partook of many others, from Max Brand and Zane Gray to Loren Estleman and Elmore Leonard and everything in between.  If it was a Western, I read it or watched it on the screen.  My heroes were Louis L’Amour, John Wayne and Clint Eastwood and the characters they portrayed.

The earlier Westerns told stories of right and wrong and the heroes of the genre lived by a black and white code of good and evil.  There was no middle ground, and there is nothing wrong with that kind of story.  In fact, I prefer them because it’s what I grew up reading.

However, beginning mostly with the films of Clint Eastwood, a new type of character was introduced into the Western, the antihero.

While there are still similarities to the Western hero of old, there are some vast differences.  Antiheroes are flawed characters.  They are not perfect and don’t pretend to be, but they still possess heroic qualities.

Like the hero, the antihero possesses honor and loyalty, but may on occasion step outside moral boundaries that a hero cannot.  Sometimes their integrity may be called into question, but there is always a line that the antihero will not cross.

It is that aspect that opens areas of new storytelling for writers because instead of the moral unequivocalness of telling stories in black and white, the gray areas of morality can be explored.  I think that if writers want to create fresh and exciting material for readers, it’s going to be in that gray area and not rehashing the same stories that have already been told.

That is what I have tried to do with Wesley Quaid, the antihero protagonist of Outlaw.  He is a bank robber who has killed plenty of men and done some things he’s not proud of, but he is still a man of honor and loyalty.

Heroes provide examples of the kind of people we should strive to be even though we might not be able to.  As humans, we are inherently flawed and so perhaps we can identify more with the antihero.

Perhaps in the future, we should mix a fair amount of antiheroes into our Westerns.  We still need heroes to emulate because as humans we have to be able to strive toward something, but part of the joy of reading is the escapism it provides, so we need characters that we can identify with also.

Outlaw Book Link on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009GDDGU8

BIO:

Matthew Pizzolato is a member of Western Fictioneers. His fiction has been published in various online and print magazines. He writes a weekly NASCAR column for Insider Racing News and can be contacted via his personal website:

http://www.matthew-pizzolato.com.

Contact Links:

http://www.facebook.com/authormatthewpizzolato

https://twitter.com/mattpizzolato

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5837035.Matthew_Pizzolato

OUTLAW Book Description:

The outlaw Wesley Quaid wants to put the past behind him and start his life anew in another place where no one has ever heard of him.  When a mysterious woman he once knew resurfaces, Wesley discovers that a man can’t run from his past anymore than he can run from the kind of man he has become.

To view or purchase Outlaw today visit Amazon.com.

Categories: Western, Western Authors, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Where Did All the Cowboy’s Go?

When I began asking western authors and writers to guest post on my blog to honor the National Day of the Cowboy, I had to ask western author and enthusiast Phil Dunlap. His well rounded history of western novels have a great impact on the western genre, and his knowledge of the American Heritage is well shared abroad.
Welcome Phil, and thank you for your great contribution to the National Day of the Cowboy Blogathon.

When I was in my impressionable youth, I lived for the weekends. Every Saturday was          another double-feature at the movies.  The Western movies. I’d get popcorn and a Coke and scoot down in the middle row and take up residence for the next two or three hours. All my heroes were cowboys or sheriffs or gunslingers or, well, you get the picture. As I got older, and finished high school, went to college, got my first real job, I just naturally figured I’d just move on and adopt a new set of heroes.

Problem was that it didn’t happen that way. I was somehow unable to mentally separate myself from the dusty trails and boulder-laden desert of the southwest. Oh I had other interests, of course: illustrating, flying, graphic design, all of which I immersed myself in to one degree or another. And I seemed to be sailing along quite well, until I actually went out west and walked among those very same boulders, cacti, and hot, dry sands that had held my interest for so long. And the mountains, those incredible mountains. The renewal of all those wonderful dreams of being on the streets of Tombstone or hunkered down behind a rise to await the inevitable ambush from Apaches, or riding a horse up and down the arroyos and across dry riverbeds in pursuit of outlaws. There’s even a smell of something that lingers just out of reach, it’s the smell of life and death, and it whisks you off to a time when good and evil clashed so demonstrably that you couldn’t escape the clarity of its presence. And maybe just a hint of fear that it might catch up to you.

So, today I write Western novels. Why? Is it really that I’m still just a cowboy at heart? If that’s true, I know I need to reach out to all the other cowboys to share what I love about the West. Wouldn’t I like everyone to read my books and get caught up in the excitement of the early gunfighters, Indians, ranchers, and railroaders? You bet. And that’s why I’m here. Because, while to some it may seem a stretch, I think we’re all cowboys. We all love to ride in a convertible with the top down, race along on a motorcycle, or jog on a mountain trail in the cool morning air. Just like cowboys. Therefore, In my mind, every single one of us is a cowboy at heart. I know I am.

And that brings us to the National Day of the Cowboy, which will be celebrated July 28, 2012. Yep, just around the corner. It’s a celebration of all that’s the old West, but it’s also about the spirit that lingers in us all. It’s the spirit that drove men to do marvelous things in the most dangerous conditions imaginable in an effort to accomplish a dream: to build a nation. And they did. Those hardy pioneers–the cowboys, ranchers, farmers, railroaders and merchants–all worked tirelessly together to build what we enjoy today: the greatest nation in the world. And, by golly, we’re still doing it.

***

Phil Dunlap is the author of eight published Western novels (with three more contracted for). He’s been a TV Director, free-lance journalist (Newspapers and magazines), graphic designer, professional pilot/flight instructor, and an advertising agency executive. He has two series: US Marshal Piedmont Kelly (Avalon Books,
soon to be Amazon Encore), and his latest books are in the Sheriff Cotton Burke series from
Berkley Books (PenguinUSA). To purchase Cotton’s Law click the image provided for my book on Amazon.com

I hope you’ll visit my website at: http://www.phildunlap.com and peruse my books, events, and tidbits. My blog can be accessed at: http://lureofthegun.blogspot.com.

You can also find Phil on his Amazon author central Phil Dunlap.

Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, NDOC, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Celebrating the Skills, Protecting the Dream

I also had the chance to chat with Tyler Brentmore, a newly published western author, and his take on the heritage of the American Cowboy. Welcome Tyler.

Heritage Days are not a new phenomenon, and in some parts of the West I’ve traveled through locals would be hard-pressed to identify when normal life turned into heritage. The beds may have gotten softer, communications a mite easier, but a working ranch still needs its working men, and most of those are cowboys.

In my adopted second state of New Mexico there are around 6,800 stock-raising ranches. Including their support services, their businesses employ 18,000 people and pump over $2bn into the economy. This isn’t heritage, it’s normal life.

Over in Quay County, where the red dirt roads grid out the original surveyor’s one mile sections, feet are still pushed into boots, hats onto heads, at a time of the morning most town-dwellers don’t know exists. Breakfast comes later.

I mention to my host the stop-start tire dust threading its way towards us across the flat landscape. He doesn’t even lift his gaze. “Oh, that’ll be Henry.” State news might arrive through the television or radio, but the mail comes from a neighbor with a USPS sticker in the cracked windshield of his pickup. If Henry drops it in the mailbox or stops to collect the mail-to-go, there might be a wave. If he drives up to the ranch house he’s bringing more than letter news and everyone downs tools. It’s been a system that worked before telephones and email, and if it ain’t broke there’s no reason to fix it.

Henry carries more than mail and news, he carries goodwill and quiet concern. He has a standing invitation to collect vegetables from the garden which he’ll drop off later on his route – to the recently bereaved, to the returnee from surgery – and he’ll hear how things are over a coffee and pass on what’s needed. In a widespread community of fiercely independent people, I can see the benefit. It’s the reason my host is a First Responder EMT.

On Sunday we ride to the family church, a modern, airy building. I join in with the hymns, I listen to the sermon. It’s the notices that catch my ear, the community pulling together, encouraging their young by fundraising to augment a scholarship, congratulating a junior rodeo rider, supporting the family of a disabled serviceman. Over refreshments I hear plans to lend equipment and manpower, to share a cost. There’s talk of travel both near and far, of books read, jokes shared.

Then we’re out in the parking lot and I’m admiring the red-painted one-room schoolhouse strategically set on trimmed grass opposite its sprawling modern equivalent. “I was schooled there,” says the beaming woman who’d earlier poured coffee, “and I went to college.” I don’t doubt it, the way I know she’s told the story to grade students across the way. We should all seed a dream.

We ride out towards The Caprock where the wind turns the turbine blades. We’re heading for a single withered tree, all that’s left of a fruit garden. Grandparents lived here, raised stock, grew corn, taught the next generation how to work with the land, with the animals. The foundation line of their home remains plain in the thin dirt. It’s hardly bigger than the pickup we’ve traveled in. We talk of the dust bowl, of tornados, of hailstorms. But we talk, too, of childhood memories, of swinging from the tree, of sitting on the porch on Grandpa’s knee watching sunsets that filled the sky with fire and took away the breath.

Writers like me ill-serve these people. We focus on the notorious, the sensational. Sure, they were here: Black Jack Ketchum roamed these lands, William H Bonney, Dave Rudabaugh and many more. But such as these were far outnumbered by those pioneering men and women who did not try to take the easy route, those who kept to their purpose with courage and determination in the face of adversity, those who could, and still do, seal a deal on the shake of a hand and a look eye-to-eye. It is their traits that we write into our fictional heroes, when such heroes and heroines surround us every day.

If you are planning to enjoy a BBQ on Saturday, or shout for the barrel-racers, or just listen to a Country tune as you drive through landscapes to bless the eye, give your support to the National Day of the Cowboy. Deep down its values are yours.

Tyler Brentmore writes historical Western fiction. The first, Dead Men’s Fingers, follows a man as he finds the inner strength to face his past and do what’s right to protect his family.

Available as an ebook from:
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0076QKFME
Barnes&Noble: http://bit.ly/BN-DMFingers
All Formats: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/136833

Visit with Tyler Brentmore at: http://www.tylerbrentmore.com

Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, NDOC, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Cowboy: An Iconic Symbol of American History

I had a chance to talk to several western genre authors, and writers about their feelings on the National day of the Cowboy, and it becoming a national day of recognition of our American heritage and the American Cowboy’s Heritage. During my interviews, and conversations with many of the authors and writers, I expressed how I would like to honor the National Day of the Cowboy by posting our personal feelings on the rich history that we know and love to write about. I feel it is important that our readers see, that we as authors want to support the movement in recognizing the Cowboy as a day we celebrate here in America.  I was able to get nine of the authors I spoke with, to guest post on my blog to honor the Day of the Cowboy. This week here on my blog, as well as my very good friend, and co-author Tim Bultman’s blog at cowboywithacause.com.  will be sharing  and honoring the true history of our country,and the true and rich history of our American Cowboy as it was when the Cowboy paved the way for America.

This Morning I would like to introduce a western wordslinger, as he is known Mathew Pizzolato. Hello Matt, What is your take on the iconic symbol of the American Cowboy.

Matthew Pizzolato

There are few things in this world that are unique to this country. The Western genre as a whole and the cowboy in particular go hand in hand as symbols that represent everything that is American.

The cowboy that rode across the American West helped to settle this country. He braved Indian attack, wild horses, stampedes, drowning and every other form of horrible death imaginable. The cowboy’s time came and went, but it was glorious while it lasted. While it was a period of danger and death, it was also one of loyalty and honor.

The cowboy often rode from can-see till can’t-see and faced death every second he was in the saddle. In fact, many of them lost their lives or suffered debilitating injuries. It was said one could tell a cowboy by his missing fingers or a gimp leg.

While he faced death every day, the cowboy was a man of honor, integrity and loyalty. He rode for the brand and was loyal until death. When he gave his word, he kept it no matter the consequences. Most of all, the cowboy was self reliant. He depended on no one but himself to get the job done.

The cowboy is a stereotype that transcended gender and ethnicity and encompassed all political affiliation. All cowboys and cowgirls adhered to a strict personal code that has quietly slipped away from popular American consciousness.

As a Western writer, I strive to keep the spirit of the cowboy and the American West alive in my work. It is my way of honoring those brave and hardy souls who made this country great. My characters, whether they are cowboys, lawmen or outlaws, exemplify the cowboy’s spirit of honor, integrity and loyalty.

Perhaps former president George W. Bush best described the meaning of the National Day of the Cowboy. “We celebrate the Cowboy as a symbol of the grand history of the American West. The Cowboy’s love of the land and love of the country are examples for all Americans.”

Modern American society has fallen away from the virtues that the cowboy held dear and would benefit from being made aware of the cowboy’s lifestyle, of his values and of his personal code. That is why the National Day of the Cowboy is so important.

It honors an icon that lives on in the hearts and minds of those who read and write Westerns and is exemplified everyday by those modern day cowboys and cowgirls who live and work on ranches in all 50 states, not to mention those who participate in rodeos all around the world.

The National Day of the Cowboy brings to the forefront the values that shaped this country and it honors a true American legend – the cowboy, who gave his blood, sweat and tears and many of them their lives, to those of us alive today and it’s something we shouldn’t forget.

By Matthew Pizzolato

Bio:
Matthew Pizzolato is a member of Western Fictioneers. His short story collection, THE WANTED MAN, is available for the Amazon Kindle and as a Barnes and Noble NOOK BOOK. His fiction has been published online and in print in such publications as: BEAT to a PULP!, The Copperfield Review, PULP MODERN, Frontier Tales Magazine, The Pink Chameleon Online, Perpetual Magazine, Long Story Short, and The Storyteller. He writes a weekly NASCAR column for Insider Racing News and is a contributing writer for Suite101.com. Matthew can be contacted via his personal website: www.matthew-pizzolato.com or he can be found on Twitter @mattpizzolato. When he’s not writing, Matthew is the Editor-in-Chief and webmaster of The Western Online.

Amazon Book Link: The Wanted Man http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006JEQM8U

My Blog: The Western Wordslinger
http://thewesternwordslinger.blogspot.com/

My Facebook Page:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Matthew-Pizzolato-Writer/144443992318861

Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, NDOC, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

National Day of the Cowboy Free Ebook Giveaway

In honor of the the NDOC National Day of the Cowboy, myself and Mathew Pizzolato are having a free Ebook giveaway all week long Beginning July 23rd, and ending July 29th. As part of our appreciation to the American Cowboy, we want to give back to our readers. I will be giving 20 copies of My brand new self-published Ebook “Laramie’s Code”, 2 per day and Mathew copies of his Ebook “The Wanted Man”.

To be added in a random drawing please comment on any of the blog posts during this weeks National Day of the Cowboy blogathon, and we will announce the winners July 30th. Good luck to any and all of our participants.

Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dear Pat Garret, It’s Me Billy (A Letter From the Grave)

Dear Pat Garret,

It’s me Billy, I used to call you a friend, better yet a Pal, but you shot me in the dark, unarmed. That’s right I am writing from beyond the grave to let you know I understand why you chose blood money for the price on my head. Hiding behind a badge didn’t make you right, and it sure doesn’t justify John Tunstall or Alex Mcsween’s murder. You see the Regulators and I had but one purpose and that was to expose the Sante Fe Ring, and Murphy’s bunch to President Hayes, and prove to him the corruption in government in Lincoln County, that was all. The men who took a Bullet from myself or one of the Regulators deserved it, they needed to be killed for killing John Tunstall in cold Blood. You tried once to arrest me for killing Buck Shot Roberts, one of the men we had a warrant for murdering John, He fired first so it was in self defense, and most all of the killings the Regulators were responsible for were in the same manner, so as a man who sold out to the Ring of corruption in government, how does it feel to know you killed a man that was really trying to do right by John Tunstall and Alex Mcsween. The problem with you and all of Murphy’s Men, Sheriff Pippin, and Sheriff Brady, blood money seemed better than finding the truth in the Lincoln County War, I didn’t draw first blood, I only finished it, Murphy dying should have ended it, but governor Lew Wallace was just as corrupt. I was only ever convicted of killing Sheriff Brady, but he needed killing to Pat, just as well as anyone else that was being bought by Murphy and Dolan’s outfit. The District Attorney should have pardoned me as they promised in the first place, I put most of them in a grave, and the rest I testified against, and in return I got a gallows built for myself.

You see Pat, Chavez, Doc, and the others knew what it meant to be pals, we might have killed a lot of men but we had a code, a code that John taught us, ethics  we lived by, until we were killed by you, someone who once called us a friend. we didn’t sell out on friendship Pat, why did you? We kept our promise, PALS, which was much stronger than any government, or any ring of corruption. We believed it had to be stopped, but the corruption in our government thought it be better to kill the men trying to expose it than to imprison the men that should have been paying for their debts, their murder, and  their corruption. Instead the government backed them up, and helped them come after the Regulators.  You may have your concience, but they sold you as soon as they paid you, which leaves you nothing more than a coward. Call it what you will, but in the days of the Billy the Kid and the Regulators we were judge and jury and most men just needed killing, and they reaped the whirlwind, as you will one day yourself. You know what they say about you Pat Garrett…..You killed men like you killed buffalo’s, but at least you didn’t ambush the buffalo’s in the dark.

YOUR PAL

William H. Bonney

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Wyatt Earp’s Revenge VS. Laramie’s Thunder

I am glad that a friend recommended this new movie Wyatt Earp’s Revenge, if you have not seen it yet, I urge you do.

For starters, watching Revenge brought me back to “Tombstone” which also starred Val Kilmer, and had me thinking, what would be different if Kurt Russell were Doc Holliday, and Val Kilmer Wyatt? as in “Wyatt Earp’s Revenge“.

One of the reasons I liked this movie the most is, the story tells about Wyatt’s past in Dodge City, when most of the movies and books we see about Wyatt Earp concentrates on Tombstone, and the Vendetta Ride, which is what he is most famous for. However there is so much more that happened in Wyatt’s life, things that led him to Tombstone in the first place, and why he left Dodge City to begin with.

I also liked the movies twist of the young boy coming back as an inquisitive reporter to discredit Wyatt, because of his father’s death at the hand of Spike Kennedy, and blaming Wyatt for his death, although to the boy’s surprise Wyatt telling him the whole story changed his mind about the blame he placed and the how he felt about his loss.

Secondly having a movie such as this helps me with my novel Laramie’s Thunder, because I found so many similarities in my book, and in the theme of this film.

In relation to Laramie’s Thunder, this movie is rather close in the story line and themes.  My Main character Texas Ranger Laramie Taylor leaves his post in Garrett, TX to avenge his father’s death in Oak Valley, TX. Going against the law and turning renegade outlaw to bring in the outlaw, one of the many themes within my novel.

Another similarity is the friendships, other lawmen to join Wyatt’s Cause in seeking revenge, which taps in to Laramie’s Thunder with Fellow Texas Ranger John Quintin and four ruthless Cherokee Indians joining the Taylor’s in a three state manhunt for the Collins’ Crew, and always being there to aid Laramie, as Bat Masterson, Charlie Basset, and Bill Tillman do in Wyatt Earp’s Revenge.

“If you’re determined to ride into the gates of Hades itself, I’m gonna ride by your side!”

In addition to those similarities, the main themes of Wyatt Earp’s Revenge and Laramie’s Thunder are very close. Any man would do anything for someone he cares about, or Loves. Wyatt turned in his badge to hunt his beloved Dora’s killer down,  and In Laramie’s Thunder; Laramie swears vengeance on anyone involved with the Collins’ Crew, they killed his father in a bank job gone badly, and they have to hang for it. If they don’t he will kill them in retribution for his father. Against all odds Laramie Taylor and Wyatt Earp will ride to the ends of the earth for their vengeance, at no consequence to the law, they are the law, and if the law won’t make them pay, then they will.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Western Genre a New Rising.

I am a western fiction writer/author, and I spend a great deal of time just researching the western genre, and what I read about our genre is more on the dying side than on the rise. I would like to ensure that our genre has not died; in fact, I believe that it is making its new rising.

The Legend of Hell's Gate: An American Conspiracy

I read today, a blog posted last November about the western genre dying titled The Slow Death of the Western Genre (in honor of BigBlackHatMan) which you can read from the link provided. The article began to say that there were very few western genre films in the 90’s, and the western genre began to die off in the 80’s, unless it was a crossover. Disgruntled with knowing it was not very true I did some searching of my own, and in my search, I found several movies, which the blog author failed to mention, as well as the people that commented on the post as well.

I began with the big screen and yes, it starts where our blogger left off at Back to the Future III, which was a crossover western, yet many western films were not mentioned. Movies  like Dances with Wolves, Quigley Down Under, Young Guns II, The Last of the Mohicans, Unforgiven, Tombstone, Rio Diablo, Frank and Jesse, Legends of the Fall, Wyatt Earp, Desperado, Wild Bill, Riders of Purple Sage, Gunfighter, Purgatory, as well as Silverado starring actor/author, and a new found pal Ken Farmer, and this list goes on and on. Did we forget about Emilio Estevez, and his boyish looks as Billy the Kid, and certainly forgot about Kurt Russell in Tombstone, and Kevin Costner in Wyatt Earp.

Young Guns II

This is why it disgruntled me so much that so many Western films have come into the late 20th and 21st century as well and not even thought of by the author while writing this blog. Written in 2011, I was amazed that neither he nor any of the comments mentioned 3:10 to Yuma, or Jeff Bridges in an awesome performance in the remake of John Wayne’s True Grit.  Counting from 2000 to 2012, I have counted nearly a dozen westerns that were solely of the old west, which proves, the Old West is not in the grave just yet, with a new film just  released March 3oth, 2012 The Legend of Hell’s Gate: An American Conspiracy.

As a western writer, and author I wanted to include Western Fiction books, I see countless books published in the western genre all of the time, from titles like Yuma Gold by Steven Law, and The Devil in a Bottle by Carol Buchanan, as well as so many others, I could spend days just listing them . Even coming into a digital age not long ago, I can count dozens of western books available on Kindle, the IBook store, and Nooks, which brings a completely new breed of some great western genre authors.

Also noted in the blog above was the fact that the reason not many were interested in the genre anymore was the age of space, and fantasy, and yes possibly the age of space, science fiction, and fantasy has taken us by storm. Maybe if Jeff Bridges Sparkled in True Grit, we might just get the media to agree we as a genre are still on the rise.

The Pony Express

Our history is built from the Old West, and without it, there would be no Boomtowns, which led to a railroad and later Hollywood, so why not keep it alive, has the media forgotten, that media itself originated by means of The Pony Express, which has a rich history in itself in the Old West. I think they should look our way more often than they do, and notice that we are a rising genre as like any other genre. It seems we are only in the mainstream media when it is to review us as a dying entity, yet more and more westerns have come, and are coming.

Here on Shotgun Bo Rivers Blog, the Old West will never die; at least while I am alive and kickin, here at Bo’s place there will always be a spot for a good western genre story, book, or movie.

Categories: Current Events, Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Welcome to Shotgun Bo Rivers

With great pleasure I bring to you a fresh, clean, and exciting  look to Shotgun Bo Rivers, The Old West in the 21st century. This month marks my two year mark for being a self-published author and blogger, and this week my Ebooks are finally available for purchase and are in good format, which I have Mark Coker to thank for his wonderful Ebook Smashwords Style Guide.

I want to personally thank everyone that has guided, coached, helped, and supported me through the past two years, I can actually say I am still plugging away, I have a lot more to learn, and a whole lot more to offer the Western Genre community, readers and authors alike. I hope that those of you that have helped me in one way or another will still hang in there with me as I reach for the stars.

I also begin Dan Blanks, Build an Author Platform course this week and I am super excited. to get that under way.

Nonetheless without further ado, I Bring you Shotgun Bo Rivers, The Old West in the 21st century. be sure to visit my Facebook page for a special welcome link that I built just for you.

Categories: Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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