Posts Tagged With: western writers of america

Launching GoFundme Campaign

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I have launched a Gofundme Campaign to raise funds needed to publish my Laramie Taylor Saga, beginning with Laramie’s Thunder. while I am well under way at finishing the rough draft. I am in need of funding to travel to conferences, and author events to find the right publishers to take on my project. I am asking you to my readers, supporters, fellow Western authors, and western enthusiasts abroad to Fund Laramie’s Thunder. visit http://www.gofundme.com/FundLaramiesThunder to give for this wonderful trilogy that I have pioneered from the beginning, and help me in my journey to becoming a successful author.

Thank you to all of my readers, and PALS.

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Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, Laramie Taylor Series, Western, Western Authors, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Four Dead in Five Seconds(Story of Dallas Stoudenmire)

Researched By Shotgun Bo Rivers @shotgunborivers

El Paso was in the grip of change from a frontier border town to a major stopping point for the railroads. The town fathers recognized a need to realign their town’s image from that of a lusty, violent, and crime ridden backwater to a modern thriving city. After much in the way of trouble hiring and keeping a town marshal, they went national in their search for someone up to the task of taming the miscreants and insuring the money kept flowing into both the hands of local merchants and the out of town investors bringing yet more wealth into the area. Globe Restaurant owner Stanley “Doc” Cummings, who lived in El Paso, Texas convinced his Brother-in-law Dallas Stoudenmire that he should come to El Paso and take up the marshal’s position.   Stoudenmire fit the bill to tame the tough town of El Paso. In early April, 1881, Stoudenmire traveled to El Paso and was hired almost immediately, starting his new position on April 11th. He was the sixth town marshal in just eight months.

It was only three days later that the “Four Dead in Five Seconds” gunfight happened. Sometimes referred to as the “Battle of Keating’s Saloon,” the “Four Dead in Five Seconds Gunfight” occurred on April 14, 1881. The events that led up to the gunfight began when the Manning Brothers had stolen a herd of of about 30 head of cattle in Mexico and drove them into Texas to sell. When Texas Ranger Ed Fitch and two Mexican farmhands by the names of Sanchez and Juarique investigated, the two Mexican men where killed in an ambush, said to be Johnnie Hale’s men that killed them. This led to a Mexican posse of more than 75 men to cross into Texas seeking an investigation.

At the request of the Mexican posse, Gus Krempkau, an El Paso constable, accompanied the posse to the ranch of Johnny Hale, a local ranch owner and known cattle rustler. There, they found the bodies of the two Mexican farmhands. The El Paso Court soon held an inquest into the deaths of the two men, with Krempkau acting as an interpreter.

Afterwards, Constable Krempkau went next door to Keating’s Saloon to retrieve his rifle and pistol, where he’d left it while appearing in court. It is speculated that Krempkau exited the saloon and placed his rifle in a saddle holster. A confrontation erupted between Krempkau and ex-City Marshal, George Campbell, who was a friend of John Hale’s. Also in the saloon was Hale himself, who was unarmed, heavily intoxicated, and also upset with Krempkau, because of his involvement in the investigation, and poor interpretation. Suddenly, the drunken Hale, pulled one of Campbell’s two pistols, shouting, “George, I’ve got you covered!” Hale then shot Krempkau, who fell wounded against the saloon door, or in the street, the story becomes contradictory at this point, because It was also said that this portion of the event may have happened outside, where hale jammed a six-gun into Krempkau’s chest and shot the lawmen in the lungs.

Bringing himself to a sobering reality, Hale had realized what he did, and ran behind a post in front of the saloon just as Marshal Dallas Stoudenmire appeared with his pistols raised. Stoudenmire then shot once but the bullet went wild, hitting an innocent Mexican bystander. in my research I also discovered that the Mexican bystander, may have also been a fruit peddler. When Hale peeked out from behind the post, Stoudenmire fired again, hitting Hale between his eyes killing him instantly. In the meantime, Campbell saw Hale go down, and exited the saloon, waving his gun yelling, “Gentlemen, this is not my fight!” However, the wounded Krempkau disagreed, even though mortally wounded and down, Krempkau managed a shot at Campbell, striking him in the wrist and in the toe. At the same time, Stoudenmire whirled and also fired on Campbell, pumping three bullets into his guts.  Campbell crashed to the dusty street, shouting at Stoudenmire, “You big Son of a Bitch, you have murdered me!” When the dust cleared, both George Campbell and Constable Krempkau lay dead.https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSydf6ddwbfHJI0UqGkN9tiRBjoQ4c-LBfBY5Kei2jHrEVAKLC4

In less than five seconds in a near comic opera gun battle, four men lay dead, and Dallas Stoudenmire the only living man left in the gunfight. In other contradictory research I also learned that Gus Krempkau may not have been the first shot. However, the majority can agree that the event was very quick; Stoudenmire was the only survivor, Hale was drunk, and Campbell indeed proclaimed the before stated words.

At the time, the gunfight received a lot of national publicity, reaching newspapers as far east as New York city, and as far west as San Fransisco. It is also rumored that years later, an author in search of a story contacted one of the living participants of the incident. The ailing gentleman refused to speak, and the author elected as a second choice to interview Wyatt Earp, and went on to write a best-selling book. Thus, the Gunfight at the OK Corral became a well recognized event, whereas the Four Dead in Five Seconds Gunfight has been on a back shelf awaiting our Hollywood enthusiast’s portrayal.

Readers Interaction::

What do you think, would the story of this famous, and contradictory gunfight be a good film? and how would you capture just five seconds in an epic film? The only way I see it happening would be starting the film with a build up story before the gunfight, and the aftermath which ultimately ended former Texas Ranger Dallas Stoudenmire’s life. What are your thoughts? feel free to comment and thank you for stopping by the Old West in the 21st Century’s blog.

Categories: History, Legend Series, Western, Western Authors | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

My western inspiration

Growing up I was introduced to westerns on the silver screen, my late grandfather loved westerns, and would watch them regularly, which in most cases became a family night at my grandfather’s house ice cream sundae’s made by my grandmother, pop-corn or peanut brittle and good ole’ fashion horse-shit and gun smoke movie was a typical night at grandpa’s.

Purchase Today

My love for western writing didn’t really come until my mom brought home a book from a tag sale with the name Elmer Kelton on the cover, The Good Ole Boys. I was always told never judge a book by it’s cover, but when I got The Good Ole Boys, I flipped it over and read. “In Hewey Calloway’s world, his West Texas home of 1906, and the land of way of life that he loves are changing too quickly for his taste.” The way I had always felt an outsider looking in at the way life changed so rapidly around me. From then on The Good Ole Boys, became my favorite book, and Elmer Kelton my favorite author. I had to read more. Kids my age were collecting baseball cards, and comics, me I was collecting Elmer Kelton books.
Later I came to enjoy Louis L’Amour, and the Sackett’s, however, my personal favorite is Elmer Kelton. I have been told that my writing style is somewhat similar to his, although I take no credit from Mr. Kelton, as he was the greatest western author that ever lived, I do see some similarities in my western stories and that of the story of Hewey Calloway.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Western Genre a New Rising.

I am a western fiction writer/author, and I spend a great deal of time just researching the western genre, and what I read about our genre is more on the dying side than on the rise. I would like to ensure that our genre has not died; in fact, I believe that it is making its new rising.

The Legend of Hell's Gate: An American Conspiracy

I read today, a blog posted last November about the western genre dying titled The Slow Death of the Western Genre (in honor of BigBlackHatMan) which you can read from the link provided. The article began to say that there were very few western genre films in the 90’s, and the western genre began to die off in the 80’s, unless it was a crossover. Disgruntled with knowing it was not very true I did some searching of my own, and in my search, I found several movies, which the blog author failed to mention, as well as the people that commented on the post as well.

I began with the big screen and yes, it starts where our blogger left off at Back to the Future III, which was a crossover western, yet many western films were not mentioned. Movies  like Dances with Wolves, Quigley Down Under, Young Guns II, The Last of the Mohicans, Unforgiven, Tombstone, Rio Diablo, Frank and Jesse, Legends of the Fall, Wyatt Earp, Desperado, Wild Bill, Riders of Purple Sage, Gunfighter, Purgatory, as well as Silverado starring actor/author, and a new found pal Ken Farmer, and this list goes on and on. Did we forget about Emilio Estevez, and his boyish looks as Billy the Kid, and certainly forgot about Kurt Russell in Tombstone, and Kevin Costner in Wyatt Earp.

Young Guns II

This is why it disgruntled me so much that so many Western films have come into the late 20th and 21st century as well and not even thought of by the author while writing this blog. Written in 2011, I was amazed that neither he nor any of the comments mentioned 3:10 to Yuma, or Jeff Bridges in an awesome performance in the remake of John Wayne’s True Grit.  Counting from 2000 to 2012, I have counted nearly a dozen westerns that were solely of the old west, which proves, the Old West is not in the grave just yet, with a new film just  released March 3oth, 2012 The Legend of Hell’s Gate: An American Conspiracy.

As a western writer, and author I wanted to include Western Fiction books, I see countless books published in the western genre all of the time, from titles like Yuma Gold by Steven Law, and The Devil in a Bottle by Carol Buchanan, as well as so many others, I could spend days just listing them . Even coming into a digital age not long ago, I can count dozens of western books available on Kindle, the IBook store, and Nooks, which brings a completely new breed of some great western genre authors.

Also noted in the blog above was the fact that the reason not many were interested in the genre anymore was the age of space, and fantasy, and yes possibly the age of space, science fiction, and fantasy has taken us by storm. Maybe if Jeff Bridges Sparkled in True Grit, we might just get the media to agree we as a genre are still on the rise.

The Pony Express

Our history is built from the Old West, and without it, there would be no Boomtowns, which led to a railroad and later Hollywood, so why not keep it alive, has the media forgotten, that media itself originated by means of The Pony Express, which has a rich history in itself in the Old West. I think they should look our way more often than they do, and notice that we are a rising genre as like any other genre. It seems we are only in the mainstream media when it is to review us as a dying entity, yet more and more westerns have come, and are coming.

Here on Shotgun Bo Rivers Blog, the Old West will never die; at least while I am alive and kickin, here at Bo’s place there will always be a spot for a good western genre story, book, or movie.

Categories: Current Events, Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Thank you for helping me write.

I have not blogged in a while, heck I haven’t even been writing, and it has driven me crazy. Life caught me up in a drag for a while, and everything that has gone on with family stuff has just been overwhelming. Good news, I went on vacation to clear my mind and it worked, I have a few days of house work to do, and some stuff coming in to take care of for my wife’s new business venture, but I think in a few days when things are in order I may just get to sit down with my novel, read and rewrite, and some more writing, there is a lot to do, however, I have to read what I have, because I sort of forgot where I left off. I know as a writer, you should write something everyday, so today is my starting point of the next step of my writing career, I plan to write something everyday, even if it is just thoughts, or scenarios, anything that might stimulate my novel, and anything else that I am working on. I have a how to book that I have ached to finish which explains the road I have taken to self-publishing my first two books, with no money at hand at all. They are not a complete success,  but a great experience all the same, it has surely gotten my feet wet in how the writers world works. I want to say With gods amazing grace self-publishing introduced me to some wonderful people, and they deserve to be mentioned.

  Honorable mentions are Dan Blank, a great teacher in learning how to build an author platform, I have learned a lot from him, and have not yet taken his course, mostly because I am financially embarrassed, at the moment and don’t have the cash to take it, but still have learned a lot just the same, if interested in his course you can join by visiting http://wegrowmedia.com/, I hope you can learn something from one of the leaders in the industry. Another honorable mention, and my very first tutor in writing in K.M. Weiland, an awesome teacher, and her blog, and videos, just happen to be in my price range, Free, although free, Ms. Weiland is great with teaching, and sharing how to build your characters in your story, and I definitely have learned a lot from her, my favorite blog among them all that I follow. The Creative Penn is another great place to learn, and refresh writing, skill, and vocabulary, etc, Joanna covers it all from writing, publishing, even selling your books, to subscribe to these wonderful blogs, visit K.M Weilands blog www.kmweiland.com, and her wordplay wordplay-,kmweiland.blogspot.com/, which helps the writer become an author. Visit Joanna Penn’s blog www.thecreativepenn.com/ for some awesome interaction, with writing,blogging, publishing, etc.

Now I must not forget a dear friend that I have met via the writers digest community, that lives in the same town as me, memoir writer Kathleen Pooler, with some of her advice, and points in the right direction, I may not have found the above people. she has helped me in my journey of becoming an author, and deserves some great credit, so please if you enjoy a good blog, visit krpooler.com/, through faith, hope, love, and adversity Kathleen is in the middle of telling her story, and directly from her blog  How does a woman from a stable Christian home go off on so many self-defeating detours and how does she come back home again? 

From some of the stories that are in her book, I feel that you will ask these questions while reading the whole book, and those questions will hook you to the very end, I can assure you from a western genre reader, and writer, Kathleen’s memoir, is a must read even for me.

Well to the wonderful people I mentioned above, I want to personally thank you for all the lessons, and learning that I have picked up from you, and I want to also personally thank all the people who I have not mentioned, you know exactly who you are, from writers digest, twitter, blogging, and facebook. you are wonderful, and I thought it was about time that I thanked you all. Jackie Gordon, Steven Law, James Wright, Larry Payne, J.R. Sanders, and everyone in my group Western genre Fiction/nonfiction. Thanks to all of you for the support, comments, blogs, and webinars, I appreciate it.

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Legend Series (The legend of Fort Dodge Silver)


Fort Dodge Silver lost treasure

In the year 1853, a freighting train of 82 wagons full of silver left Mexico up the Santé Fe Trail. An old Mexican freighter named Jesus M. Martinez, who was well known by many of the plainsmen of that day for his honesty and bravery was in charge, unfortunately, The Santé Fe Trail was well known to the Indians, also. Martinez was wise to the Indians ways though and corralled the wagons every night and posted guards to give the alarm should danger approach in the way of Indians, bandits, or prairie fires.                                                                                     

Sante Fe Trail

  One day, as they began making camp, Martinez decided to be especially alert throughout the night. All that day, Indians observed in the distance, which could mean trouble. As the sun set, the dogs began to make a fuss, which aroused the suspicion of Martinez, Indians lurked nearby. He called a meeting to decide what would be the best course of action to pursue, and it was decided to prepare for the worst. The men dug trenches and piled dirt, and wood around the holes for protection. When  finished, they laid in the ditches, as they waited with weapons cocked. The Indians made a dash for the camp. Prepared the Mexican’s had the greater advantage and shot so much lead into the attacker’s direction; the Indians were forced to fall back. When morning came, the first wave of Indians hit the Mexicans position with little to no effect. All throughout the night, the Indians continued and attempted to find a weak spot in the Mexicans fortifications. For five days the siege continued with few Mexicans being killed, but not nearly as many Indians who had sustained a huge loss of warriors. The Indians were crazed for blood and vengeance was sought for the brothers and chiefs who had been killed and would fight to the last warrior. The Mexicans had been in a comfortable position for the first few days but  were low on ammunition,  and the Indians were not about to stop attacking. On the sixth night, the Indians made a desperate attack  through the Mexicans lines, but were driven back.The rifles ceased fire for lack of ammunition. Once the guns were still, the band of bloodthirsty Indians swept over the camp, engulfing the brave Mexicans. During the ensuing struggle, only one man is known to have escaped the fight. Old Jesus Martinez somehow slipped away and hid himself while his men were  slaughtered. He remained in his hiding place until morning.

when he was sure the Indians were miles away,  he crept back to what was left of the camp. All around him lay the signs of battle. Dead men were scattered everywhere, wagons overturned and burned, their food and clothing covered the ground and all the animals had been run off.  After searching through the wagons remains, he finally found the silver they were carrying. untouched by the Indians, since it was of no value to them, compared with a good horse and rifle. Martinez carried twenty-one bars of silver, valued at $1000 each, to a spot a little ways from camp, and buried them so they would be safe until he could return with help to recover them. Satisfied that he had hidden the money as well as he could under the circumstances, he started out on foot for his home in Mexico. Shortly after arriving home in Mexico, he died, but not before telling his son of the massacre, and the whereabouts of the hidden silver. Several years passed before his son was able to travel to the site of the battle, which was about four miles west of Dodge City, Kansas. From the directions his father had given him, he located the area where the silver was buried and began shoving a wire into the ground hoping to hit the treasure. He spent several weeks searching, but became disgusted and quit when he couldn’t find anything of value. Young Martinez next traveled to Fort Dodge, where one night while drinking heavily, he told two men what he had been looking for. The word of a hidden treasure nearby spread like wildfire and soon half of Fort Dodge was looking for the silver. Old Martinez evidently hid the bags better than he thought, or his son confused the directions to the site, because no one has ever found as much as one coin.

Thanks to Legends of America, and http://www.gwizit.com for detailed and quoted info.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Breaking News! Louis L’Amour Was Not the Last Western Writer

I snagged the title for this blog from oldwestnewwest.com a great site for all things about western writers.

The reason I did, is because I keep hearing that same ole thing, just like many other western writers do, “Too bad Louis L’Amour’s gone. Nobody writes Westerns any more.”

However, we are writing westerns, many of us in fact. a small list of authors like W.R. Benton, Steven Law, Peter Brandvold, and Howard Hopkins come to mind, even myself.

The idea for this blog post came to me in a comment made on my Facebook wall, and I say this with all respect, and I quote “Unless you change it to Louis L’Amour no one will know who the new one is anyway.” which was in reference to a question, I asked about using a pen name for my western novels. This statement got me thinking, yes we all know Louis L’Amour, and at this point in my life not many have heard of me as an Author at this point,under my birth name or any pen name, but wasn’t there a time in 1951 that the public had not yet heard of Louis L’Amour and “Westward The Tide?” So it would stand to reason why people haven’t heard of me or will not know who I am when Laramie’s Thunder is first published either, I actually expect that at first, however with the several stories I have laid out to follow my first western, hopefully I will draw in some good readers, and prove that I am a western writer of the old frontier. I already know, I am not Louis, and I am certainly not Zane Grey either, but if you mix the two together, well in a simple kind of way you will be able to say that I can write among them as a western writer and author.

You see it started for me long ago, the first time I felt a that wild west wind blow through me, I was just 15 and was beginning a chapter in my life that later I would pursue as my adventures across the country. Rodeo season had begun, and a friend asked if I wanted to try to ride a bull, it sounded great so I had to give it a try, what I didn’t realize was that after I got up off the ground, tasting the arena dirt for the first time, and dusting off my wrangler jeans I looked out into the crowd, and I saw the great unknown, the desert sands under pounding hooves chasing after a band of outlaws, with a six-shooter and a horse as fast as you could see. At first I knew it was only my imagination running wild, but as time went on, I learned many things about myself, not only was I a modern-day cowboy, but something else entirely. The love of the old west always left me to wonder what could have been, why wasn’t I born a hundred years ago, and where do these visions keep coming from. It was simple I needed to tell these stories, write them down, and explore across the great divide, see as a writer, I live the story as my readers are reading it, and with each description, I show what I have dreamed about for the last decade, and show you from the beginning what I saw that one summer night as I looked out into the cheering audience.

So I hope that no matter what name I choose, you will see the west as I do, and see that western writing is here to stay. It is a part of our history whether it is fiction, or non-fiction, the western genre tells the story of what it was like, to live in a time where there were few rules, an open range and a six-shooter was judge and jury.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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