Posts Tagged With: Western Writing

Good Sunday Morning

Good Morning everyone, thanks for stopping by, I would like to invite you to my virtual book launch today. I will be discussing both books; What Happened to me, and my new western Fiction, Letters From The Grave.

We will be playing some trivia, Q&A, and some other fun giveaways. all are welcome, so grab your favorite drink, your latte, and favorite music list and join in on the fun, and the memories.

You can join us here on my Virtual Book Launch Party for What Happened To Me, or use the QR code. Looking forward to seeing you there.

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Categories: Current Events, Firefighters, History, Letters from the grave, Western, Western Authors, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Western ePulp’s the modern pulp magazine, What……..?

Posted by: Ritchie White @shotgunborivers

Pulp magazines were originally published from 1896 through the 1950s. The typical pulp magazine was seven inches wide by ten inches high, half an inch thick, and 128 pages long. Pulps were printed on cheap paper with ragged, untrimmed edges. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Magazines printed on higher quality paper were called “glossies” or “slicks”. In their first decades, pulps were most often priced at ten cents per magazine, while competing slicks were 25 cents apiece. Pulps were the successor to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are best remembered for their lurid and exploitative stories and sensational cover art.

Western Story Magazine was a pulp magazine published by Street & Smith, which ran from 1919 to 1949.It was the first of numerous pulp magazines devoted to Western fiction. In its heyday Western Story Magazine was one of the most successful pulp magazines; in 1921 the magazine was selling over half a million copies each issue.

Western Story Magazine began when Street & Smith executive Henry Ralston decided to convert one of the company’s nickel weeklies, New Buffalo Bill Weekly, into a pulp.  Ralston installed Frank Blackwell as editor of the new magazine. The magazine attracted a number of famous Western authors, including Charles Alden Seltzer, H. Bedford-Jones, Stewart Edward White, W. Ryerson Johnson and William MacLeod Raine. The November 25th, 1920 issue was the first issue to carry the work of Max Brand (writing under the pseudonym George Owen Baxter). Brand’s work would dominate the magazine in the next decade; he would write dozens of stories for Western Story Magazine both under his own name and several pseudonyms. Western Story Magazine was also prominent in publishing material by women writers, including B. M. Bower and Cherry Wilson.

In the 1930s, the publication’s roster of authors expanded to include Walt Coburn, William Colt MacDonald and W. C. Tuttle, while noted pulp illustrator Walter M. Baumhofer contributed several covers.

In the late 1930s, Blackwell was succeeded as editor by John Burr, who edited the magazine until it ceased publication in 1949.  to read more about the original western pulps visit The western Story on pulpmags.org.

https://i0.wp.com/api.ning.com/files/D1*nxuy077RsofWSz5UE-rGqy6yNy--oewMzw6URuDGoHvkP8AgcCHmg0*ALTYoWzU7AnTQas4NaUV*fwYe78zkIupwyzqdh/Vol3cover.jpg

A new chapter in the western pulps has arrived in ePulps, Well what in tarnation is an ePulp?

Well,I’ll tell ya, as explained on Rope and Wire  an ePulp is a western magazine in the style of the old western pulps like, Ace-High, Cowboy Stories or Zane Grey Western Magazine, however in electronic format. Since 2011 Rope and Wire has published four wonderful ePulps. They have the same great covers as the old pulps once did, and new stories come alive once again in each one to tell the traditional style stories of the old west, the danger, suspense, intrigue and deception as they do in Christopher Scott’s Rope and Wire’s Western Short Stories

What does the future hold for ePulp’s, will they continue to make a comeback? I know I plan on reading them, and after doing some research, I may attempt to even write one.

What are thoughts and comments on the ePulp?  Will you read them?

Categories: Western, Western Authors, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Heroes and Antiheroes in Westerns (Guest Post By Mathew Pizzolato)

We all have our heroes, some mystical, others superheroes, but me it was the outlaws and lawmen of the Old West. As an adult I still have those heroes, and in having them it fuels me to write at my best. Today as Matthew Pizzolato launches his book release  for Outlaw, he stops by to tell us who his heroes are, and compares heroes to anti-heroes in westerns. Welcome Matthew, thanks for dropping by.

“As you get older it is harder to have heroes, but it is sort of necessary.”
Ernest Hemingway

Western Author Matthew Pizzolato

I think that every child needs to have direction in life, something to emulate and admire and to strive to be.  Quite frankly, everyone needs heroes.  As a young man, I found my heroes by reading Westerns.

Mostly, I read Louis L’Amour but I partook of many others, from Max Brand and Zane Gray to Loren Estleman and Elmore Leonard and everything in between.  If it was a Western, I read it or watched it on the screen.  My heroes were Louis L’Amour, John Wayne and Clint Eastwood and the characters they portrayed.

The earlier Westerns told stories of right and wrong and the heroes of the genre lived by a black and white code of good and evil.  There was no middle ground, and there is nothing wrong with that kind of story.  In fact, I prefer them because it’s what I grew up reading.

However, beginning mostly with the films of Clint Eastwood, a new type of character was introduced into the Western, the antihero.

While there are still similarities to the Western hero of old, there are some vast differences.  Antiheroes are flawed characters.  They are not perfect and don’t pretend to be, but they still possess heroic qualities.

Like the hero, the antihero possesses honor and loyalty, but may on occasion step outside moral boundaries that a hero cannot.  Sometimes their integrity may be called into question, but there is always a line that the antihero will not cross.

It is that aspect that opens areas of new storytelling for writers because instead of the moral unequivocalness of telling stories in black and white, the gray areas of morality can be explored.  I think that if writers want to create fresh and exciting material for readers, it’s going to be in that gray area and not rehashing the same stories that have already been told.

That is what I have tried to do with Wesley Quaid, the antihero protagonist of Outlaw.  He is a bank robber who has killed plenty of men and done some things he’s not proud of, but he is still a man of honor and loyalty.

Heroes provide examples of the kind of people we should strive to be even though we might not be able to.  As humans, we are inherently flawed and so perhaps we can identify more with the antihero.

Perhaps in the future, we should mix a fair amount of antiheroes into our Westerns.  We still need heroes to emulate because as humans we have to be able to strive toward something, but part of the joy of reading is the escapism it provides, so we need characters that we can identify with also.

Outlaw Book Link on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009GDDGU8

BIO:

Matthew Pizzolato is a member of Western Fictioneers. His fiction has been published in various online and print magazines. He writes a weekly NASCAR column for Insider Racing News and can be contacted via his personal website:

http://www.matthew-pizzolato.com.

Contact Links:

http://www.facebook.com/authormatthewpizzolato

https://twitter.com/mattpizzolato

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5837035.Matthew_Pizzolato

OUTLAW Book Description:

The outlaw Wesley Quaid wants to put the past behind him and start his life anew in another place where no one has ever heard of him.  When a mysterious woman he once knew resurfaces, Wesley discovers that a man can’t run from his past anymore than he can run from the kind of man he has become.

To view or purchase Outlaw today visit Amazon.com.

Categories: Western, Western Authors, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My western inspiration

Growing up I was introduced to westerns on the silver screen, my late grandfather loved westerns, and would watch them regularly, which in most cases became a family night at my grandfather’s house ice cream sundae’s made by my grandmother, pop-corn or peanut brittle and good ole’ fashion horse-shit and gun smoke movie was a typical night at grandpa’s.

Purchase Today

My love for western writing didn’t really come until my mom brought home a book from a tag sale with the name Elmer Kelton on the cover, The Good Ole Boys. I was always told never judge a book by it’s cover, but when I got The Good Ole Boys, I flipped it over and read. “In Hewey Calloway’s world, his West Texas home of 1906, and the land of way of life that he loves are changing too quickly for his taste.” The way I had always felt an outsider looking in at the way life changed so rapidly around me. From then on The Good Ole Boys, became my favorite book, and Elmer Kelton my favorite author. I had to read more. Kids my age were collecting baseball cards, and comics, me I was collecting Elmer Kelton books.
Later I came to enjoy Louis L’Amour, and the Sackett’s, however, my personal favorite is Elmer Kelton. I have been told that my writing style is somewhat similar to his, although I take no credit from Mr. Kelton, as he was the greatest western author that ever lived, I do see some similarities in my western stories and that of the story of Hewey Calloway.

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Exploring the Romance in the Old West.

J.J. Devine

Exploring the old west, and honoring the American Cowboy heritage, certainly can not be done without romance. J.J. Devine knows a lot about the historical romance, and the romance of the old west, which is why I asked her to write about the romance of the Cowboy, welcome J.J. and thank you for this beautiful romantic insight of the American Cowboy.

I write historical romance based on a western theme. Within the pages of my Acceptance Series, you’ll find a wide range of heroines. A Cheyenne mixed blood, looking to find her true acceptance. A woman sold for her body, looking for her escape. A cowgirl unafraid to face the elements to hide-away on a cattle drive to claim her hero. A woman hell-bent to avenge her family’s death, takes off after the murders in the wilderness of the Wyoming Territory, hero in tow. The list goes on in this seven book series.
Ever since I was a young girl I’ve always had a fascination with cowboys and the women who loved them. Their lifestyles were never easy. I quickly found an admiration for these wonderful, amazing, hardworking people. Combine my captivation for cowboys with my infatuation with Native American history and the Old West and you have the stories I cannot wait to pen. My heroes are not only rugged and handsome, they love their women with possessive venom that sinks to the core. They’ll move the Laramie Mountains if that’s what it takes to prove their loyalty and love. My heroines are exquisite from the inside out. Yet, it’s not their splendor that will capture the heart of my readers, it’s their incredible ability to overcome even the utmost turmoil life has to offer. Highly flavored women who require even spicier men to hold their hearts and their passions forever.

The Cheyenne Bride

Cheyenne Bride to be available Fall of 2012 through Soul Mate Publishing
http://www.soulmatepublishing.com/

Author Bio
Reading and writing have been J.J.’s passion her whole life. Starting out with being the poet, everyone came to in high school to get that “perfect” poem for his or her boyfriend/girlfriend. She spent her weekends locked away in her room, curled up on her bed, writing short stories for only a selected few readers.
She has been happily married for 26 years to her trucker husband. She is a mother of three, grandmother of three; a lover of dogs, cats, and fish.
J.J. started to pen historical romance as a hobby when her youngest child was a year old, creating the Acceptance Series. She got serious about her writing career joining Romance Writers of America and Indiana Romance Writers of America. She penned her first paranormal romance, Into the Darkness, in 25 days, taking herself beyond her comfort zone and just giving the characters free reign of their story.
Since taking herself out of the outside working world, she has dedicated her life to her writing and her writing world and raising consciousness for Domestic Violence Awareness.

-By J.J. Devine

To contact J.J. Devine, or to read her wonderful writing, connect with her below.

You can view J.J.’s new Book trailer at  Into the Darkness

http://definingjjdevine.weebly.com/
http://definingjjdevine.weebly.com/ramblings-of-a-writer.html
http://www.facebook.com/JJDevineAuthor
jj_devine@yahoo.com
http://www.soulmatepublishing.com/

Categories: Cowboy Code, Current Events, NDOC, Western, Writing, Writing Technique | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Writers of the West: Remembering Louis L’Amour

Writers of the West: Remembering Louis L’Amour. By Jean Henry Mead. I read this blog and loved it, hope all of my readers, and fellow Western Writers can enjoy it as I did.

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Wyatt Earp’s Revenge VS. Laramie’s Thunder

I am glad that a friend recommended this new movie Wyatt Earp’s Revenge, if you have not seen it yet, I urge you do.

For starters, watching Revenge brought me back to “Tombstone” which also starred Val Kilmer, and had me thinking, what would be different if Kurt Russell were Doc Holliday, and Val Kilmer Wyatt? as in “Wyatt Earp’s Revenge“.

One of the reasons I liked this movie the most is, the story tells about Wyatt’s past in Dodge City, when most of the movies and books we see about Wyatt Earp concentrates on Tombstone, and the Vendetta Ride, which is what he is most famous for. However there is so much more that happened in Wyatt’s life, things that led him to Tombstone in the first place, and why he left Dodge City to begin with.

I also liked the movies twist of the young boy coming back as an inquisitive reporter to discredit Wyatt, because of his father’s death at the hand of Spike Kennedy, and blaming Wyatt for his death, although to the boy’s surprise Wyatt telling him the whole story changed his mind about the blame he placed and the how he felt about his loss.

Secondly having a movie such as this helps me with my novel Laramie’s Thunder, because I found so many similarities in my book, and in the theme of this film.

In relation to Laramie’s Thunder, this movie is rather close in the story line and themes.  My Main character Texas Ranger Laramie Taylor leaves his post in Garrett, TX to avenge his father’s death in Oak Valley, TX. Going against the law and turning renegade outlaw to bring in the outlaw, one of the many themes within my novel.

Another similarity is the friendships, other lawmen to join Wyatt’s Cause in seeking revenge, which taps in to Laramie’s Thunder with Fellow Texas Ranger John Quintin and four ruthless Cherokee Indians joining the Taylor’s in a three state manhunt for the Collins’ Crew, and always being there to aid Laramie, as Bat Masterson, Charlie Basset, and Bill Tillman do in Wyatt Earp’s Revenge.

“If you’re determined to ride into the gates of Hades itself, I’m gonna ride by your side!”

In addition to those similarities, the main themes of Wyatt Earp’s Revenge and Laramie’s Thunder are very close. Any man would do anything for someone he cares about, or Loves. Wyatt turned in his badge to hunt his beloved Dora’s killer down,  and In Laramie’s Thunder; Laramie swears vengeance on anyone involved with the Collins’ Crew, they killed his father in a bank job gone badly, and they have to hang for it. If they don’t he will kill them in retribution for his father. Against all odds Laramie Taylor and Wyatt Earp will ride to the ends of the earth for their vengeance, at no consequence to the law, they are the law, and if the law won’t make them pay, then they will.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Legend Series (The legend of Fort Dodge Silver)


Fort Dodge Silver lost treasure

In the year 1853, a freighting train of 82 wagons full of silver left Mexico up the Santé Fe Trail. An old Mexican freighter named Jesus M. Martinez, who was well known by many of the plainsmen of that day for his honesty and bravery was in charge, unfortunately, The Santé Fe Trail was well known to the Indians, also. Martinez was wise to the Indians ways though and corralled the wagons every night and posted guards to give the alarm should danger approach in the way of Indians, bandits, or prairie fires.                                                                                     

Sante Fe Trail

  One day, as they began making camp, Martinez decided to be especially alert throughout the night. All that day, Indians observed in the distance, which could mean trouble. As the sun set, the dogs began to make a fuss, which aroused the suspicion of Martinez, Indians lurked nearby. He called a meeting to decide what would be the best course of action to pursue, and it was decided to prepare for the worst. The men dug trenches and piled dirt, and wood around the holes for protection. When  finished, they laid in the ditches, as they waited with weapons cocked. The Indians made a dash for the camp. Prepared the Mexican’s had the greater advantage and shot so much lead into the attacker’s direction; the Indians were forced to fall back. When morning came, the first wave of Indians hit the Mexicans position with little to no effect. All throughout the night, the Indians continued and attempted to find a weak spot in the Mexicans fortifications. For five days the siege continued with few Mexicans being killed, but not nearly as many Indians who had sustained a huge loss of warriors. The Indians were crazed for blood and vengeance was sought for the brothers and chiefs who had been killed and would fight to the last warrior. The Mexicans had been in a comfortable position for the first few days but  were low on ammunition,  and the Indians were not about to stop attacking. On the sixth night, the Indians made a desperate attack  through the Mexicans lines, but were driven back.The rifles ceased fire for lack of ammunition. Once the guns were still, the band of bloodthirsty Indians swept over the camp, engulfing the brave Mexicans. During the ensuing struggle, only one man is known to have escaped the fight. Old Jesus Martinez somehow slipped away and hid himself while his men were  slaughtered. He remained in his hiding place until morning.

when he was sure the Indians were miles away,  he crept back to what was left of the camp. All around him lay the signs of battle. Dead men were scattered everywhere, wagons overturned and burned, their food and clothing covered the ground and all the animals had been run off.  After searching through the wagons remains, he finally found the silver they were carrying. untouched by the Indians, since it was of no value to them, compared with a good horse and rifle. Martinez carried twenty-one bars of silver, valued at $1000 each, to a spot a little ways from camp, and buried them so they would be safe until he could return with help to recover them. Satisfied that he had hidden the money as well as he could under the circumstances, he started out on foot for his home in Mexico. Shortly after arriving home in Mexico, he died, but not before telling his son of the massacre, and the whereabouts of the hidden silver. Several years passed before his son was able to travel to the site of the battle, which was about four miles west of Dodge City, Kansas. From the directions his father had given him, he located the area where the silver was buried and began shoving a wire into the ground hoping to hit the treasure. He spent several weeks searching, but became disgusted and quit when he couldn’t find anything of value. Young Martinez next traveled to Fort Dodge, where one night while drinking heavily, he told two men what he had been looking for. The word of a hidden treasure nearby spread like wildfire and soon half of Fort Dodge was looking for the silver. Old Martinez evidently hid the bags better than he thought, or his son confused the directions to the site, because no one has ever found as much as one coin.

Thanks to Legends of America, and http://www.gwizit.com for detailed and quoted info.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Breaking News! Louis L’Amour Was Not the Last Western Writer

I snagged the title for this blog from oldwestnewwest.com a great site for all things about western writers.

The reason I did, is because I keep hearing that same ole thing, just like many other western writers do, “Too bad Louis L’Amour’s gone. Nobody writes Westerns any more.”

However, we are writing westerns, many of us in fact. a small list of authors like W.R. Benton, Steven Law, Peter Brandvold, and Howard Hopkins come to mind, even myself.

The idea for this blog post came to me in a comment made on my Facebook wall, and I say this with all respect, and I quote “Unless you change it to Louis L’Amour no one will know who the new one is anyway.” which was in reference to a question, I asked about using a pen name for my western novels. This statement got me thinking, yes we all know Louis L’Amour, and at this point in my life not many have heard of me as an Author at this point,under my birth name or any pen name, but wasn’t there a time in 1951 that the public had not yet heard of Louis L’Amour and “Westward The Tide?” So it would stand to reason why people haven’t heard of me or will not know who I am when Laramie’s Thunder is first published either, I actually expect that at first, however with the several stories I have laid out to follow my first western, hopefully I will draw in some good readers, and prove that I am a western writer of the old frontier. I already know, I am not Louis, and I am certainly not Zane Grey either, but if you mix the two together, well in a simple kind of way you will be able to say that I can write among them as a western writer and author.

You see it started for me long ago, the first time I felt a that wild west wind blow through me, I was just 15 and was beginning a chapter in my life that later I would pursue as my adventures across the country. Rodeo season had begun, and a friend asked if I wanted to try to ride a bull, it sounded great so I had to give it a try, what I didn’t realize was that after I got up off the ground, tasting the arena dirt for the first time, and dusting off my wrangler jeans I looked out into the crowd, and I saw the great unknown, the desert sands under pounding hooves chasing after a band of outlaws, with a six-shooter and a horse as fast as you could see. At first I knew it was only my imagination running wild, but as time went on, I learned many things about myself, not only was I a modern-day cowboy, but something else entirely. The love of the old west always left me to wonder what could have been, why wasn’t I born a hundred years ago, and where do these visions keep coming from. It was simple I needed to tell these stories, write them down, and explore across the great divide, see as a writer, I live the story as my readers are reading it, and with each description, I show what I have dreamed about for the last decade, and show you from the beginning what I saw that one summer night as I looked out into the cheering audience.

So I hope that no matter what name I choose, you will see the west as I do, and see that western writing is here to stay. It is a part of our history whether it is fiction, or non-fiction, the western genre tells the story of what it was like, to live in a time where there were few rules, an open range and a six-shooter was judge and jury.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

What began my writing process(What truly made me want to write)

Many questions arise when people of my past realize what kind of person I have become, a writer, Why, and how, and truly what for?

I really began writing in 1993, during a troubling time in my life, I used my emotion in writing Poetry and Songs, and the feeling had always been there to explore many other things, at that point in my life, I just didn’t know how.

As the years have past I have picked up my journal, and written about good times, bad times, and where I have been and gone, and then I put it back down, to sit another year or so.

This all changed for me in 2009 when I lost my job to the economy this last time, I sat for many nights in front of my computer wondering where do I go from here. I had a journal with my poetry and songs collected over the years, and a half written chapter to a novel, that came to mind at one time or another, and a few short stories about rodeo life, this is about all I had left of the last 12 years, except for my wonderful wife and daughter.

So I began to research, how to publish a book, and I remembered a place that I submitted a poem to once, and received an award, they published books, but how?
For the most part the rest is history, and I am deep into my third book already, however, I still here the questions, what made you want to write?

It is simple for me, it is the story, the action and adventure all written in words to bring my reader to the edge of their seat and keep them lingering there, and grasping onto the page as if they were living the actual story, and I think if I can do that, then I have fulfilled what I sought out to accomplish thirteen months ago just sitting in my office with the sound of a piano echoing Lane’s Theme from the 8 seconds Soundtrack, and sipping on a hot cup of coffee freshly brewed at 2:30 in the AM.

Now I have your attention. I want you to sit back and enjoy, as I begin to tell you the journey I have taken over the last thirteen months.
At first it was only LULU.com, and I was sort of restricted. I wasn’t sure where else to look, however one night as I was in the midst of attempting to publish the first edition of my poetry book, I stumbled upon a writers digest community and some other forums in which people just like me were trying to become authors or already were self-published authors, and they knew the game I was about to play. Working night and day to do the best I could on what I had I needed to cry out for “HELP”, and the answer came back within just a few days, I met several people that were established in the writing world. I used their advice to my fullest extent, and It was just two months later, that the second edition of my book was available at Createspace. I was off and running, with a good book in front of me,which I had published, written and marketed all on my own. Now my sales still are not that great and mostly I gave away more copies than I sold, but I am an Author now, and I was very happy with what I had accomplished.
I just had to keep going, and I started to have fun with my rodeo stories. I realized i didn’t have enough for my own book, so I thought, if I get my friends in on this, and put a small book of what a rodeo cowboy, or cowgirl goes through, or what their emotions are when they compete, then we would have a masterpiece, and we have done just that, at least I think so. We ran into a few minor glitches, but things are beginning to run smoothly and possibly the book will be available just after the holidays. I call it Merry Christmas 2. Laugh Out Loud.

Now underneath all of this was that half chapter of a western novel just sitting around, and at this point I am already doing it, it being an author, why not continue, so I have embarked on a journey back in time in the late 1800’s and well once I get back in the saddle in the next week or so, will probably be living in a ghost town outside of Garret Texas, living and breathing the desert sand, and living the life of Texas Ranger Laramie Taylor. Many times I have been stuck, my writing dwindled for a bit due to a six month treatment I had to have, but it is coming to and end, and i am just beginning to pick up a pen or my keyboard and begin again, the year is 1877.

If you were a Texas lawman, in this era, what would you do when a ruthless bunch of outlaws guns down your father, would you cross the line, or will you stay the coarse hoping that justice is someday done, the question that I have to answer in about 65,000 words, and doing so with an 1860 colt .44-caliber revolver, nickel-plated, with ivory handles, and CAPT John Taylor engraved on the side. Guts or glory Laramie will seek Vengeance I have felt it since the beginning. I hope you all agree. Thanks. Ritchie White

To view a portion of this novel visit my web page

http://borivers.webs.com

I hope I answered the question why do I write, and if I haven’t in the above statements, well it is simple, I love stories, and the old west, and my child like imagination is still alive inside, and if I put history, the old west, words, wisdom, and imagination together, I can tell you a story, that will have you on the edge of your seat, and gripping the pages from the beginning of chapter 1 to the very end.

Categories: Western, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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